17 Oct
11 Jan
Art Scene in Zagreb from 1950s to Now
Art Scene in Zagreb from 1950s to Now

Art Scene in Zagreb from 1950s to Now

Ribnjak ulica 2, 10000, Zagreb, Croatia, Zagreb, Croatia
Participating Artists: Gorgona Group, Josip Vaništa, Julije Knifer, Ivan Kožarić, Dimitrije Bašičević Mangelos, Tomislav Gotovac, Goran Trbuljak, Sanja Iveković, Dalibor Martinis, Mladen Stilinović, Vlado Martek, Boris Cvjetanović, Igor Grubić, Andreja Kulunčić, David Maljković & Božena Končić Badurina Carré d'Art - Nîmes Museum of Contemporary Art Exhibition from October 17th 2014 till January 11th 2015 Curator: Branka Stipančić, art historian, exhibition curator (Zagreb) Contents Presentation of the exhibition Catalogue of the exhibition Selected Biographies List of works on show Images Practical information Forthcoming exhibition PRESENTATION OF THE EXHIBITION The exhibition connects the works of fifteen artists and one group; it presents a personal brief history of the radical tendencies of modern and contemporary art in Croatia, and focus on the art scene in Zagreb. The international cultural policy of Yugoslavia, which in the post-WWII period received the position of “nonalignment” - between the opposing blocks, cooperated openly with the East as well as the West. Major events in 1960s: in avant-garde music (Music Biennale), visual arts (New Tendencies), experimental film (Genre Film Festival), Student Theatre Festival, translations of a considerable number avant-garde literature as well as meetings of sociologists and Marxist philosophers from all over the world (Praxis & Korčula Summer School) intensified international relations by creating a specific creative atmosphere. Contrary to general standpoint that artists worked in isolation (“behind the iron curtain”, as it was incorrectly claimed due to neglecting political specificities) and in spite of non-existence of an art market and other forms of support for visual artists, Zagreb was a vibrant culture centre. The title “Personal Cuts” (appropriated from a video work by Sanja Iveković) refers to these autonomous artists as well who have each, for particular reasons, dismissed an objects-based practice in favor of an art that engages an essential social morality and who have established a very personal relationship with society, politics and art of both the past and the present. The focus is on conceptual tendencies in the broadest sense of the term from the period of 1950s and 1970s (“new art practices” as they called in 1970s in the region) and spread towards art of today which has a strong conceptual background. “Conceptual” has to be understood differently then in western canon, it covered enormous range of means of expression, wide array of works and practices. The artists moved towards new materials, media, methods, and behaviour, they moved their interest from object to the conduct of art, searching for the redefinition of the role of the artist towards social, political, and economical realities within they were living. On the other hand their great art always goes beyond its immediate context and it is universal. Different artistic positions appeared in the late 1950s when artists surpassed modernism, which was the mainstream in then Yugoslavia, and affirmed themselves through anti-art (Gorgona Group: Julije Knifer, Josip Vaništa, Dimitrije Bašičević Mangelos, Ivan Kožarić), happenings and experimental film and performative arts (Tomislav Gotovac). The exhibition represents institutional criticism (Goran Trbuljak), pioneers of video art (Sanja Iveković, Dalibor Martinis, urban interventions, language works (Mladen Stilinović, Vlado Martek) in 1970s. It follows social and political changes at the time of communism (Boris Cvjetanović), as well as at the time of transition, which introduced many new topics: failed economies (Andreja Kulunčić), desired amnesia in relation to the communist past (David Maljković), homophobia (Igor Grubić), interrelationship between museums and their visitors (Božena Končić Badurina). Within this movement there was significant politically subversive behaviour and activity and it is essential that the work of these artists be observed from a current perspective. Their works are reflection of social and political circumstances but more then this an expression of individual talent, intelligence, sensitivity, Eros, education, a sense for social contacts, persistence, resourcefulness and a good deal else. The exhibition is on upper floor of the Museum covering over 1000 Square meters. It is the biggest presentation of Croatian artists outside Croatia. The exhibited works are courtesy of Croatian institutions: Museum of Contemporary Art, City of Zagreb – Studio Kožarić, Modern Gallery, Glyptotheca – Croatian Academy of Science and Arts, Institute of Art History, Tomislav Gotovac Institute, then of Museum of Contemporary Art Metelkova (Ljubljana) and Kontakt, Art Collection of Erste Group and ERSTE Foundation (Vienna), as well as by private collectors from Zagreb, Belgrade, Vienna and New York. However, most of exhibited works are courtesy of the artists from Zagreb. CATALOGUE OF THE EXHIBITION Bilingual French-English catalogue (edited by Branka Stipančić) It includes the following contributors: Irena Bekić, Boris Cvjetanović, Ana Dević, Silvia Eiblmayr, Tomislav Gotovac, Boris Greiner, Sanja Iveković, Rada Iveković, Julije Knifer, Božena Končić Badurina, Ivan Kožarić, Andreja Kulunčić, Mangelos, Vlado Martek, Dalibor Martinis, Jean-Marc Prevost, Dejan Sretenović, Mladen Stilinović, Branka Stipančić, Josip Vaništa, Igor Zabel, and others. PERSONAL CUTS : Art Scene in Zagreb from 1950s to Now 248 pages ca. 140 documents Format 21 x 26 cm Diffusion Les Presses du Réel
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