12 Nov
12 Dec
Laka Competition Winners: 2016
Laka Competition Winners: 2016
Laka Competition Winners: 2016
Laka Competition Winners: 2016
Laka Competition Winners: 2016

Laka Competition Winners: 2016

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Laka Competition: 2016 Results Announced The second edition of the Laka Competition: “Architecture that reacts” came to a close and we can hardly wait to reveal this year's main prizes and honorable mentions, which came as a result of an animated exchange of views of the Judging Panel, consisting of leaders in architecture and design, renowned experts, educators, researchers and practitioners who determine the directions of development of modern architecture. Laka Competition is an international architectural competition which seeks innovative ideas that go far beyond typical building solutions, are socially engaged, capable of reacting to unpredictable conditions (environmental, natural, social) and provide safety for its inhabitants. The main evaluation criteria in the competition have been to indicate an architectural, social or environmental issue to solve, analyze it accurately and choose an architectural solution that “reacts” and resolves the indicated issue. The registration to the competition was open until November 1, 2016. We have received 127 projects from 255 participants based in 40 countries. It is worth noticing how important in successful design for global change is synergetic approach – our interdisciplinary teams consisted of students, architects, professors of architecture, designers, artists, automotive engineers, mechanical engineers, civil engineers, computational designers, environmental designers, interior architects, visual designers, industrial and manufacturing engineers. Solving the issues of overpopulation of the world's biggest cities, lack of socially friendly public spaces, post-war societies or problems of invasive water, were only a few to mention from the most prevalent, impressive topics in this year's edition. The selection process of the best designs was not an easy task. Throughout the month of November the international panel of Judges (Tobias Wallisser – LAVA Laboratory For Visionary Architecture, Julien De Smedt – JDS Architects, Peter Kuczia, Ana Maria Gutierrez – Fundación Organizmo, Arturo Vittori – Architecture and Vision, Nathalie de Vries - MVRDV, Qun Dang – MAD Architects) have worked on selecting the winners and laureates of honorable mentions. Hereby we are happy to announce the laureates of the 2016 edition of the Laka Competition: “Architecture that reacts” (https://lakareacts.com/competition-2016/): 1ST PRIZE: project no. 0104 “Snapping Facade” by Jin Young Song (Architect and Assistant Professor, Department of Architecture, University at Buffalo, State University of New York), Jongmin Shim (Assistant Professor, Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, University at Buffalo, State University of New York), USA The Snapping Facade touches a widespread contemporary problem of heat gain/loss, adequate sunlight provision as well as an insufficiency of aesthetically pleasing solutions to it. As the designers summarize it, "Snapping Facade explores a sustainable building envelope design strategy that utilizes elastic instability to create dynamic motion at the building envelope." The artifact is not only very clever in its simplicity, reactive to the current need, but also visually appealing and being a small scale design it is able to influence the large scale in a low-cost manner. The Judges were unanimously impressed with the project. 2ND PRIZE: project no. 0112 “SUBURBAN SWELL” by Ryan Clement, Eric Dell’Orco, USA "Suburban Swell reacts to fears of density by using the lifestyle of the suburbs as a framework for a new vertical morphology of density that embraces light, community, land ownership, individuality, and the American dream. Suburban Swell is based on the form of the cul-de-sac, an urban form that is ubiquitous in American suburbs." - the authors describe the project. “YES! Let’s densify and not in a bad way but in a great way, let's combine the density of Manhattan with the comfortable life of the American Suburb!” architect Nathalie de Vries (MVRDV) stresses the brilliance of the idea. 3RD PRIZE: project no. 0101 “URBAN OASIS / Synergetic, living prototypes” Markus Jeschaunig (Artist, Architect / Agency in the Biosphere), AUSTRIA The URBAN OASIS is a climate-change oriented installation, “Oasis No. 8”, taking place from September 2015 till the end of 2016. The aim of this initiative is to raise awareness by bringing real plants, that is a banana palm, to a place where they could not exist naturally. The designers claim that “Synergetic urbanism is an answer on the challenges of climate change.” and we do agree! Architect Qun Dang (MAD Architects), Laka's Judge, mentioned that a big value of this design is having nature influence the existing environment in different corners of the city. We would also like to take this opportunity to congratulate the designers awarded the 10 honorable mentions, that is: 0075 “Socially Active Ecosystems” by ASA Studio – Active Social Architecture: Alice Tasca (Partner Architect), Francesco Stassi (Partner Architect), Zeno Riondato (Partner Architect), Jaime Velasco Perez (Architect), Christian Karagire (Architect), 0055 “Hexapods: a new vernacular architecture” by Maricruz Miranda-López (Architect & Interior Designer), Sofía Amodio-Bernal (Architect, Senior Designer), Bridget Munro (Architect, Architectural Designer), 0107 “Green Umbrella” by Dr. Hee Sun (Sunny) Choi (Urban Designer), Jorge Sainz de Aja Curbelo (Architect, Urban design researcher), Tony Chiu Cheuk Lun (Design Assistant), Eason Yeung Kit (Design Assistant), 0150 “Pop Up Places of Worship” by Lucas Boyd, Chad Greenlee, 0142 “Drift City: Architecture’s Reaction to Sea Level Rise” by mcdowellespinosa: Seth McDowell (Architect, Assistant Professor, University of Virginia), Rychiee Espinosa (Architect), Brad Brogdon (Architect), 0058 “[FLINCH]: the first line in catastrophic hurricanes” by Adrienne Strohm, 0057 “WATER PER MOVE” by Asmaa Almunayes (Bachelor in Civil Engineering, Master Student in Architecture school), 0115 “The Vertical Tree Burial – Architectural Reaction to Developing World And Constant Beliefs” by Huihui Luo, Runjia Tian, Sibo Qin, Yuhan Wu, Ziyi Xu (Architecture Students), 0035 “PHENIX MEETS CHIMERA” by Humberto Miguel Aguiar Pereira (Architect), Luis Duarte Ferro (Architect), 0116 “Urban Acupuncture” by Tyler Laird, Harrison Smith (Architecture Students, University of Colorado Boulder). We are glad to notice a growing interest in design for social change in academic institutions. In the 2016 edition students of 24 universities from all around the world, including the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, University at Buffalo, University of Colorado Boulder, College of Architecture (Illinois Institute of Technology), Yale School of Architecture, Istanbul Technical University, Aalto University (Helsinki), Newcastle University, Pratt Institute School of Architecture, Harbin Institute of Technology and many others, were busy with the Laka Competition! The future of your design. Laka Accelerator and more... We have got exciting news for this year’s participants! While you were busy preparing the designs, the Laka Team has been thinking how to make them happen in the near future. As a result of the process, in 2017 we are launching the Laka Accelerator, which will allow selected designs - not only the awarded ones - to receive substantial support for implementation thanks to an exceptional group of Experts, who agreed to share their knowledge and experience. We believe that together we can influence problem areas and actually change the world. We will also be glad to stay in touch with all participants for more implementation and/or promotion options in the future. Kasia Burzynska, Laka's Editor in-chief, reveals that selected Participants will be asked to give us short interviews for promotion in press and on the Laka Blog. "2017 will bring even more surprises - our team is working on a book of interviews with Experts, Laka Perspectives, which will provide an endless source of inspiration for everyone who wants to get involved in social change!" - she says. We would like to thank our Partners and the Media for supporting the initiative. In 2017, next to the Laka Competition and Laka Accelerator, a new section of Laka Education will be launched! Rafał Przybyła, Programs Director of Laka, underlines that due to a very large number of reactive project submissions, in the beginning of 2017 Laka is launching a new platform, Laka Education, which will be the place for independently developed themed educational programs. "The main goal of Laka Education will be to understand individual aspects of responsiveness and newest directions of development of architecture and technologies in the context of their social and environmental potential." - he adds. The program will be executed with selected Laka Experts, academic institutions and all Participants of the Laka Competition, who would like to investigate the potential of "Architecture that Reacts" with us as a part of the Laka Education. Stay tuned for more information in the near future! Thank you! As the competition holders we would like to thank all the participants of this year’s edition. Each and every project told a story we were fascinated to discover. We are sure looking for solutions to the set problems was a developing experience in various ways for all the participants, just as analyzing them has deeply moved and influenced us personally. It is highly impressive, how designers all around the globe are able to observe, understand and work with sensitive areas and questions. “We received a great number of innovative projects, some of which were to be evaluated in strictly theoretical terms, others were very practical and technically ready for implementation!” says Damian Przybyła, the Founding Director of the Laka Competition “The submitted designs incorporate solutions of different scale and level of complexity, however explicit majority of them look for an answer to the question about the current role of architecture and its ability to impact the social and natural environment in a positive way.” Our outlook on the future is bright, as we see how precisely set the goals are in the submitted projects. It shows a high level of social consciousness, as well as prove a large potential of architecture and new technologies in solving certain challenges. Laka is a non-profit organization and world-wide network focused on social impact via design and architecture. Through a comprehensive strategy and with a support of our Partners, we develop projects and programs that underline the crucial role of architecture and technology in the process of social change (https://lakareacts.com). We would like to encourage you to get involved in the Laka. We are currently looking for potential Partners and Sponsors in order to make the project implementation possible in a larger scale, and our programs increasingly more accessible. If you would like to join our amazing group of Partners, do not hesitate to contact us! 1ST PRIZE: REG. NO. 0104: SNAPPING FACADE / USA AUTHORS: Jin Young Song (Architect and Assistant Professor, Department of Architecture, University at Buffalo, State University of New York) Jongmin Shim (Assistant Professor, Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, University at Buffalo, State University of New York) AUTHORS' DESCRIPTION: Snapping Facade explores a sustainable building envelope design strategy that utilizes elastic instability to create dynamic motion at the building envelope. The building envelope controls heat gain and loss, allows views for visual comfort, and provides natural light. Advances in the high performance glass industry have made the use of glass ubiquitous. The reflection and refraction of glass represents the dynamic, bustling activities of our cities while diverse lifestyles and programmatic functions are expressed through the façade of our buildings. However, in the United States, buildings account for 41% of energy use and 38% of CO2 emissions. The increasing need for high performance building envelope and advancements in manufacturing industries have facilitated the design of dynamic envelope system to replace traditional, uninspiring shading controls. Built dynamic façade systems such as Abu-Dhabi Investment Council Headquarters by AHR Architects, dynamic roof shading at Aldar Central Market by Foster + Partners, Hoberman Associates and Adaptive Building Initiative and Kiefer Technic Showroom by Giselbrecht+Partner are based on mechanical actuators which need additional energy consumption to operate and require complex maintenance. Advances in material science and engineering have also contributed to the mission of smarter building envelope. For instance, electrochromic glass uses voltage to change light transmission property. Other Smart glass such as Suspended Particle Devices can provide the similar function and form-changing polymer sheet can be installed in the glazing units. Compared to the mechanical dynamic shading, these glass systems can efficiently provide substantial energy saving with low cost, however the façade design becomes independent gears added to the irrelevant building design. Snapping Facade suggests an alternative approach for the design of dynamic facade systems that use a “snapping-induced motion” to open and close apertures, providing shading for the building. The prototype explores using weakening-induced bands tied within the elastic threshold which, produce “snap” deformation with minimal stimulus. Traditionally, unstable movement within the building construction is considered as an undesirable occurrence but, the Snapping Facade aims to harness the characteristics of elastic instability by applying it as an opening and closing mechanism using the embedded energy within the materials. Without complicated maintenance, users can participate in the dynamic movement of the building envelope for play, fun, and energy saving. This elastic instability is already utilized in kids’ products such as Rubber ball poppers and Snap Bracelets. Foldable car window shades also use the property of snapping. As for building, the snapping bands will be explored with patterned metals, plastics, and/or wood veneers. The engineering of intentionally applied weakening building components will be also tested. The membrane between the bands need be tested through metal origami, fabric, and other hybrid methods to find optimal folding mechanism. 2ND PRIZE: REG. NO. 0112: SUBURBAN SWELL / USA AUTHORS: Ryan Clement, Eric Dell’Orco (University of Colorado Boulder) AUTHORS' DESCRIPTION: Suburbia is the expired perception of the American dream; it is shaped by the desire for land, green space, privacy, and safety. Whereas, the metropolis is shaped by economics, business, culture, and the exchange of ideas. These different environments create separate lifestyles that seldom overlap. Dense urban centers are naturally more sustainable than a low density suburb as they consume less energy, are less dependent on automobiles, have greater access to economic opportunities, and have more cultural amenities. With future population growth, communities must respond to the increasing housing demand. In the United States, metropolitan growth does not increase density, it increases sprawl. Why does the U.S. expand through sprawl? Land ownership, privacy, and refuge are the driving cultural values that encourage sprawl and contribute to the “American” fear of density. The fear that giving up land ownership takes away one’s independence, individuality, and control. Contemporary forms of density do not acknowledge these ingrained cultural values. Failing to recognize these values will lead to indefinite sprawl. Suburban Swell reacts to fears of density by using the lifestyle of the suburbs as a framework for a new vertical morphology of density that embraces light, community, land ownership, individuality, and the American dream. Suburban Swell is based on the form of the cul-de-sac, an urban form that is ubiquitous in American suburbs. Suburban Swell is a structure designed to be built above any cul-de-sac; it vertically extends the cul-de-sac, transforming any given neighborhood into a denser and more urban version of itself. As such, removing the necessity of the automobile, and encouraging the use of alternate modes of transportation. The intimacy, community, and green-space found in a cul-de-sac is preserved, while the density is increased. Suburban Swell does not provide a finished living space; instead, it provides a base for a vertical neighborhood. There are unbuilt plots of land, where each person can build to suit their needs and preferences. With this land ownership, the ideas of the American dream are not lost but rather embraced. There is still a backyard, there is still a place for the children to play, there is still the single family home. If architecture integrates density and the American dream, density is no longer scary. If density becomes desirable suburban sprawl can be eliminated. 3RD PRIZE: REG. NO. 0101: URBAN OASIS, Synergetic, living prototypes / AUSTRIA AUTHOR: Markus Jeschaunig (Artist, Architect / Agency in the Biosphere) AUTHOR'S DESCRIPTION: Statistically, the banana is the most popular tropical fruit in several European countries and available in supermarkets all year round. Getting to enjoy bananas and other tropical fruit in Europe requires a high level of energy and global logistics. Harvested while still green, the fruit is shipped from exporting countries with a subtropical climate (mostly Latin America) to Europe. This way of consumption stands for the current ecological foot-print – requiring 1.5 Earths to meet the demands humanity makes on nature. To enter in global action against climate change, (local) built environment has to access synergetic natural systems. Material flows will have to run from 'cradle to cradle' and biotic and non-biotic systems must be united. ’Synergetic urbanism' is an answer on the challenges of climate change. Inspired by the dynamics and forces of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere, synergetic urbanism activates local resource- and material flows in order to create zero-emission products, cities and life. Synergetic space strategies utilize harvested energy rather than supplied high-quality energy. Reacting prototypes The concept of “urban oasis” intents to harvest, accumulate and transform energy streams and potentials in the urban field into synergetic cycles. Focusing on waste-heat places in the city (such as the office-, industry- and food sector), automated + social installations in different scales try to develop solutions, how food production or other needs, can be created. The installation Oasis No. 8 (2015/16) can be seen as a prototype for using local available energy sources for the production of food in urban settlements. The project is situated in a vacant lot in the city center of Graz, Austria. The tropical micro-climate inside the bubble is powered only by the waste heat of two existing refrigeration units from a restaurant and a bakery under and behind the installation. The small, artificial and parasitic habitat takes rainwater from the roofs and sunlight from the sky to grow banana, pineapple and papaya plants. Within this intervention, the automated system is self-sustaining and keeps the interior temperature over 12° degrees Celsius – the minimum temperature required by tropical plants of this kind – during the freezing winter months. By remote control, the group of volunteers (bananahood), can observe and change parameters of the technical components. The artificiality of Oasis No. 8's nature is emphasized by the transfer of tropical plants from a tropical climate zone into a non-tropical region through the creation of a closed micro-climatic habitat. Bringing real plants to a place where they could not exist naturally, creates awareness. Local action to apply scientific knowledge about strategies to fight climate change. /Installation September 2015 till end of 2016 HONORABLE MENTION: REG. NO. 0075: SOCIALLY ACTIVE ECOSYSTEMS / RWANDA AUTHORS: ASA Studio – Active Social Architecture Alice Tasca (Partner Architect) Francesco Stassi (Partner Architect) Zeno Riondato (Partner Architect) Jaime Velasco Perez (Architect) Christian Karagire (Architect) AUTHORS' DESCRIPTION: Socially Active Ecosystems: How to enable a sustainable socio-economic development for rural Rwanda? Context Rwanda is considered an example of accelerated modernization. Key element of this fast process is how to combine the physical planning strategy with the vision of society. Envisioning “a long-term bright future of Rwanda” the Government launched the ECD Policy in 2010 “to combat ignorance and illiteracy and to provide human resources useful for the socio-economic development through the education system.” Children, who are well nurtured and cared for in their earliest years, are more likely to achieve their full potential as adults. Currently just over 12% of children between 3 and 6 have access to learning services: to meet the MDG targets of 100% enrollment by 2017, public education facilities should be implemented in rural areas. As poverty, education levels, and performance as an adult are directly linked, the provision of public education facilities is essential to raise the GDP of Rwanda. Project The ECD Centers are collective and interdisciplinary projects addressing the interface between ecosystem and socioeconomic environment at both community and national levels: they react to the physical and cultural landscape and conceive child stimulation as something that concerns the entire community. Architecture, at any scale and in every location, impacts its environment: even small projects act in the formation of the roots of society and appear as the paradigm of participatory design and an interdisciplinary approach to catalyze a social change. The ECD centers integrate different programmatic components (stimulation rooms, multipurpose hall, kitchen, administration, water and sanitation facilities, playground, and kitchen garden) at various scales: territorial, settlement and building. The main pillars of the design are the role of a central space as catalyst for community gathering, and the modular structure, where components can adapt to different terrains originating similar facilities. Two main typologies have been tested with either a circular or a S-shaped plan. The modules are single story structures, built with locally produced fired bricks, whose patterns and multiple openings contribute to the sensorial stimulation of children, while providing natural lighting and cross ventilation. The porch connects all modules, there is a dedicated area for playground, and a system for rainwater harvesting. The kitchen garden is used to promote innovative agricultural and nutritional techniques. Solid waste, processed in the composting toilets, is used as fertilizer. The Centers react to their surroundings as means to address the interface between the natural and socioeconomic environment at community level. They promote cross-pedagogical activities and serve as community space for social activities that give the ownership of the space, making it socially sustainable and environmentally efficient. The design strategies foster children and their community to increase family-family and family-community cohesion. Moreover the use of local materials and builders both empowers the community and promotes social equity. The community develops construction skills later adopted to enhance private houses and access more job opportunities: last step in the virtuous cycle to enable the sustainable socio-economic development of Rwanda. HONORABLE MENTION: REG. NO. 0055: HEXAPODS: a new vernacular architecture / COSTA RICA & UK AUTHORS: Maricruz Miranda-López (Architect & Interior Designer) Sofía Amodio-Bernal (Architect, Senior Designer) Bridget Munro (Architect, Architectural Designer) AUTHORS' DESCRIPTION: Hexapods: a new vernacular architecture In 2014 the general number for the displaced population was 38 million*. Taking Ethiopia as a case study, one of the fastest population growth countries, where political land regulations work against the majority of its citizens, displacement is something that occurs to many, unpredictably and with little to none reaction time. However, context shouldn't be looked in a specific region, but rather, in numbers. Data is the new context. Countries mostly affected by displacement are the ones who have a higher population growth rate, and are usually the ones with the lowest resources. This, among other crucial responses, calls for a transitional architectural solution which is capable to adapt and quickly react under such distressed circumstances. The ancestral knowledge of lightweight, transformable and adaptable tents in vernacular Ethiopian nomadic architecture becomes essential. The key direction is the merge of this highly practical knowledge with our modern technology, creating safe, responsive, adjustable structures capable of providing a sense of belonging, appropriation, and community. A component-based system was developed which is easily dismantled, assembled, light and packable by analyzing the knots in tensile structures used in Ethiopian nomadic cultures. This was done at 2 levels: as an isolated building component, which can easily change function, and as components in a pattern that can be repeated over and over again to create a weaving structure. The “geometrization” of the knot using x, y and z axes with the coordinates corresponding to the movements necessary to tie a knot, allowed an abstraction and translation of the qualities of knot-based construction into another medium: an equilateral triangular prism, and an arrow headed stick, allowing 3 connection points and a new architectural relation of knot:rope. A hexagonal spatial configuration, provides a compact and packable structure developed into a prototypical construction system. Its frame is assembled flat, erected using torsion by twisting it upright and locked in place with electro-permanent magnetic joints. The magnetic joints allow a much quicker assembly time. Collapse is prevented using minimal surface membranes at 3 of the 6 facades. Hexapods can be interconnected, allowing growth and expansion. This system also enables community participation and an expression of cultural identity through the potential application of local materials where the minimal surface is not structurally necessary. Just as the use of knots, the Hexapods allow rapid construction (60 minutes) and deconstruction of dwellings (30 minutes). In a potential use of technology, Hexapods can react to external stimuli due to sensors, which allow water collection and solar energy collection - therefore, informing the inhabitants of their surroundings which could facilitate eventual livelihood activities like personal farming. A prototype of Hexapods was built using high-performance magnets, plywood components, canvas membranes and in situ materials. The goal of this research was to create a system that can be adaptable, compatible with varied length of building lifecycle and therefore malleable within a highly changeable context. /*according to the IDMC HONORABLE MENTION: REG. NO. 0107: GREEN UMBRELLA / HONG KONG AUTHORS: Dr. Hee Sun (Sunny) Choi (Urban Designer) Jorge Sainz de Aja Curbelo (Architect, Urban design researcher) Tony Chiu Cheuk Lun (Design Assistant) Eason Yeung Kit (Design Assistant) AUTHORS' DESCRIPTION: There are approximately 200,000 female domestic workers from other countries in Hong Kong. Most of them are employed as helpers with a residence provided by the employer, creating a situation whereby the working and living space are merged into one single space for six days a week. Government regulations dictate they must be given twelve consecutive hours of free time each Sunday, leading this massive workforce to the open spaces of Hong Kong. The Green Umbrella considers the environmental consequences of this mass movement, supporting the manner in which domestic helpers assimilate the public space surrounding them to suit their own culture and form of gathering, involving dance, games, food, naps and political rallies. Along and below elevated walkways and highways recycled cardboard is used to create temporary territories amongst the pedestrian flow and adjacent to busy roads. The green umbrella is a digitally sensing device that can provide shelter and enclosure, together with a screen showing the level of air pollution measured with built-in CO2 sensors. This will allow users to identify the less polluted areas in the city where they can rest, whilst highlighting the issue as part of the social conscience of the city. The green umbrellas will be strategically located and equipped to provide wifi to users of public space, together with a panic button to help users call for help. HONORABLE MENTION: REG. NO. 0150: POP UP PLACES OF WORSHIP / USA AUTHORS: LUCAS BOYD, CHAD GREENLEE (Yale University) AUTHORS' DESCRIPTION: Pop Up Places of Worship While religious structures do not satisfy needs pertaining to an individual’s biological survival, they do nourish one’s identity within a collective. They provide a familiar place of being. This is something that we consider synonymous with being human and a requirement for the persistence of culture. Overview: With issues like rapid urbanization, unprecedented forced migration, and an increasingly frequent devastation of built environments by natural disasters, informal settlements are taking on a new role in contemporary societies. Many of these places, while intended to be temporary, end up existing for years -- even decades -- and are home to massive populations. Children are often born, raised, and educated in such places. Families grow and develop while knowing little more than the adhoc, emergency shelters that have been deployed. Understandably, with such a reduction of amenity that much of the world takes for granted, the majority of the limited resources available are dedicated to the basic needs of the individual’s survival. These settlements, however, are often comprised of entire communities -- groups of people that have shared histories, traditions and customs -- but these cultural institutions are often lost in the midst of the desperation that surrounds, for example, refugee life. Among the most prevalent of these cultural notions is that of religious practices. This projects attempts to recognize that religious faith and practice, when all else is stripped away, is often the most fundamental thing that tethers people together. It tests this by proposing temporary places for communities to gather, worship and partake in their collective. While the exploration’s relevance could certainly extend to all cultures for whom such practices are relevant, a project scope limited to the three ‘world’ religions was established for practical reasons. Pluralism: It was of course necessary to develop a coherent explanation of our views on both pluralism as an architectural concept and what it means to live in a pluralist society. A frequent response to this in contemporary culture is to design abstracted, singular spaces that can accommodate all faiths. This would certainly shrink the scope of the project and also lessen the risk offending through cultural definition. However, we believe that this in fact would be antithetical to our purpose, for, as we have discovered, when one is trying to discover the very basic most fundamental physical manifestation of these cultural identifiers, a precision and familiarity is required. With that said, there is a proposal for each religion, but each structure is abstracted within the confines of its respective tradition. Simple Assembly: The ability for the structures to be easily packed, shipped, and deployed begins to interrogate the urban stereotypes that have typically been associated with ineffable space. In the areas where the social, political, or natural climates are such where we imagine these being deployed, we believe that they can serve as a crucial place for community development. HONORABLE MENTION: REG. NO. 0142: DRIFT CITY: Architecture’s Reaction to Sea Level Rise / USA AUTHORS: mcdowellespinosa Seth McDowell (Architect, Assistant Professor, University of Virginia) Rychiee Espinosa (Architect) Brad Brogdon (Architect) AUTHORS' DESCRIPTION: For the last 2.5 million years, the earth has participated in an ecological dance with the massive continental ice sheets covering the northern hemisphere. This dance entails a constant oscillation between ocean levels and frozen water deposited in the glaciers — a give-and-take ballet that has instigated fluctuations in water level by more than 500 feet (150 m). “Shorelines have moved landward or seaward tens of miles as a result.” Rising water level is not a recent phenomenon; it has been an unceasing operation over the history of the earth. What is urgent for us today is that water is approaching major centers of population and capital. We humans are the third, and somewhat awkward, participants in this environmental dance. For the first moment in earth’s history, sea level rise is encountering a densely developed edge condition, putting millions of lives, thousands of buildings, and hundreds of cities at risk. This is the situation of the rising: water is breaching established thresholds and invading the city, architecture, and constructed landscape. The breach is no longer an anomaly, but rather a common occurrence, and is forcing us to rethink the built environment’s relationship with water. Is it possible to build mechanisms to keep the rising water out? If so, how long will these devices protect us? Should we flee, surrendering home and culture to the forces of nature? If so, where do we go? Is it possible to imagine an amphibious architecture? Can we build environments that have the ability to withstand or adapt to fluctuating water levels? Drift City is an urbanistic, infrastructural, spatial response to this condition of rising sea levels. It is a city that floats. A city that bridges. A city that migrates. A city that transforms. A city that redistributes. A city that reconfigures the complicated relationship between water and people. It is a city structured by three operations: defense, retreat, and adaptation. The ark, as a response for survival, has become the paradigm for humanity’s response to ecological disaster: construct a mechanism for deliverance. Drift City is the continuation of this subsistence exercise. It is a floating, linear city that simultaneously defends, retreats and adapts to the rising sea. It is a city that materializes in response to the hydrological crisis prompted by climate change. It is a city that marks the edge of land and water, then migrates in both directions. Drift City is the ark of the 21st century. It is a mechanism that enable’s the control of, escape from, and adaptation to water’s ominous presence. In the wake of an escalating global crisis with water, this project is a critical evaluation of innovative design solutions to address the rising of sea levels. Drift City is a hybrid solution — a solution that says yes to defending, to retreating and to adapting. It is a city that acts as a defense wall. Yet it also instigates and enables mobility for retreating populations. However, retreat may not be permanent, but rather a form of temporal adaptation. Drift City fundamentally questions the condition of static building and offers a new way to live that is sensitive to the fluctuations of water. HONORABLE MENTION: REG. NO. 0058: [FLINCH]: the first line in catastrophic hurricanes / USA AUTHOR: Adrienne Strohm AUTHOR'S DESCRIPTION: In the fall of 2013, Typhoon Haiyan wreaked devastation in the central Philippines. Over 6,000 people perished because of this deadly hurricane. In a place where 2 out 5 citizens live on less than $2 a day, Filipinos are in dire need of an inexpensive, easy-to-build but durable home that can withstand excessive winds. This structure is to be used in the Philippines where hurricanes and other strong winds destroy [the many] shanties and poor quality housing. The shelter gets its name from living creatures’ reaction to incoming pain. Similar to the way people and animals flinch, the shelter also prepares itself to incoming catastrophe by tensing and shifting to better equip itself for impact. This structure can be created using local, inexpensive materials such as bamboo and other plant materials to create a resilient shelter that many poor in the Philippines do not have but desperately need. HONORABLE MENTION: REG. NO. 0057: WATER PER MOVE / KUWAIT AUTHOR: Asmaa Almunayes (Civil Engineer, Architecture student / University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign) AUTHOR'S DESCRIPTION: Many unfortunate children around the world lack essential needs, like water. Fortunately, children have enormous energy while they play. This energy can be utilized through design to produce drinkable water. Water Per Move is a design concept where children play in a jungle-like experience that harvests their play energy through tensile motion. Each motion will produce a single pump into the ground water which eventually bring the water up and go through a filtration system providing potable water. It is made of low cost materials like wood, ropes, plastic balls and glass pipes. These materials were chosen to make this structure more feasible to all communities in need of water and a place to play. The water per move conceptual design proposal is a solution to two problems at the same time and will benefit many people around the world. HONORABLE MENTION: REG. NO. 0115: The Vertical Tree Burial / CHINA AUTHORS: Huihui Luo, Runjia Tian, Sibo Qin, Yuhan Wu, Ziyi Xu (Architecture Students at the Harbin Institute of Technology) AUTHORS' DESCRIPTION: The Vertical Tree Burial - Architectural Reaction to Developing World And Constant Beliefs Today, two tendencies has caused the rocketing price of urban cemeteries. One is the demands that are rapidly growing. A considerable number of developed societies like Australia and Japan is undergoing the ‘aging’ process due to the change of notions and amazingly low birth rate. Meanwhile people hope to stay close to their deceased family members that they can easily mourn without travelling far into the countryside. The Other is the growing pursuit for a better burial environment close to nature. A lone columbarium in a cold locker no longer serves the solution to a better mourning place. So we found the necessity to design an urban cemetery which both satisfies the growing population of the dead and the aspiration for a better environment for the soul to rest. With this, we found great potential in the latest Vertical Tree Burial Trend, which means the ashes of the dead along with the biodegradable columbarium is buried under the tree, nurturing the plant until they become part of the soil. HONORABLE MENTION: REG. NO. 0035: PHENIX MEETS CHIMERA / PORTUGAL AUTHORS: Humberto Miguel Aguiar Pereira (Architect) Luis Duarte Ferro (Architect) AUTHORS' DESCRIPTION: PHENIX MEETS CHIMERA: Reborn from the ashes in a body with two natures Syrian Civil War destroyed million of houses and most of the cities. With the end of the war, the refugees will wish to return back to participate on the reconstruction of the country. They will find everything in ruins. How to live in the rubble? The question of the Laka Competition requires a further analysis on the human, geographic and architectonic context. Due to the vast destruction of the land, and to create an architecture that reacts, we need to think in a proposal of a territorial strategy at the scale of the country, not just the proposal of a building for social housing. In the middle of a chaotic post-war cityscape how will it be possible to construct houses for thousands of Syrians? What are the available resources to construct? Our answer and proposal is: rubble. It consists on broken pieces of concrete and bricks, that treated and cleaned, can be reused for construction. Furthermore, it became the symbol of destruction, the scar of the war. Working with the rubble means to reborn from the ashes, like the Phenix, mythological creature and symbol of regeneration. We propose the creation of a system to transform the rubble into brick as a way to provide tools and means for the population to regenerate their own houses and the country. The proposition consists on the development of a building that combines two functions: brick-making unit & housing unit. Together as a Chimera. The idea is to give housing as well as dignity, based on the opportunity to work actively on the reconstruction of own country. The combination of Life + Work, comes as a important proposal to solve the economical sustainability of the returned refugees. With the money of a project-type for social housing, we can construct five Chimeras, that lodge 250 persons, and has the possibility to rebirth Syria. We propose the construction of one floor, with the possibility of self-construction through the production of bricks that can be used to build up to three more floors. Each floor of Chimera can lodge 50 persons. Program of the Chimera: 1. Brick-Making Unit: This zone is the part where it is possible to transform the rubble into bricks. It has a kiln, storage areas and a productive patio, for the brick to be dried by the sunlight. This is a significant economic and working area, to provide dignity to the dwellers of these Chimeras. 2. Housing Unit: Its a set of apartment with different typologies (T5, T4, T3 & T2). The zones of water (kitchen and WC's are detached from the principal body of the building). To conclude, its important to mention that the architectural structure of the proposal is purposely very flexible, so that in the future, when the country is full regenerated, it can be adopted to other functions, such as- institutional, social, religious, working functions or, to dismantle brick by brick to support other constructions. HONORABLE MENTION: REG. NO. 0116: URBAN ACUPUNCTURE / USA AUTHORS: Tyler Laird, Harrison Smith (Architecture Students, University of Colorado Boulder) AUTHORS' DESCRIPTION: Architecture is in need of an alternative remedy. In the rapidly developing world dominated by the automobile, man is in conflict with nature. To provide the necessary framework for urban circulation, traditional civil engineering has blocked the natural process of evolution that has been millions of years in the making. Specifically, the universal, default impervious parking lot is contributing to our Earth’s ill health and it is in our best interest to explore, diagnose, and find a cure. By taking cues from the way acupuncture heals humans, we can apply concepts to cure some harmful side effects being caused by our love affair with the automobile and limit our impact to restore our connection to the natural world. Currently 600,000 sq. km of Earth is covered by impervious surface, increasing exponentially annually (Zhifeng 2014). This one-type fit all prescription is creating both long and short-term social and environmental problems rather than enhancing the quality of human existence. According to the US Environmental Protection Agency, average temperatures in urban areas fluctuate 22°F warmer than rural areas. This increase not only contributes to urban and global temperatures but also a higher energy demand for air conditioning, and results in more heat related illnesses. Other environmental impacts consist of increased water runoff that carries unfiltered pollutants to local streams damaging aquatic life (EPA 2016) Although, these surfaces are vital to the framework for urban circulation and transportation, these monotonous impervious sites are often an epicenter of stress for environments and people that interact with these spaces. These sites, originally created to make life easier, are contributing to water and air pollution, increased urban temperatures and a disconnect from social and environmental factors unique to these urban environments. Can we adapt this urban typology to interact with the people and land in a harmonious way that eliminates stress from both the environment, and the user? Why is it so challenging to integrate natural and manmade environments? If half of all parking lots in the United States were covered with vegetation, these lots could manage 2 billion cubic meters of storm-water runoff, produce 822,264 tons of oxygen, and remove 1 million tons of C02 annually (Green 2013). Can we incorporate and adapt alternative medicine practices as a way to heal our environment? Acupuncture improves functions of the body and promotes the natural self-healing process by stimulating specific anatomic sites. By applying these principles to the urban scale, Urban Acupuncture seeks to react to specific sites in a way that, “relieves” points of stress, and evolves parking lots into spaces that bring people together and promotes healthier environments. Urban Acupuncture begins to merge the boundaries of nature and urban form in a way that provides a new framework to allow for harmonious and healthy architecture. REFERENCES Green, By Jared. “500 Million Reasons to Rethink the Parking Lot.” Grist. GRIST, 09 July 2013. Web. 26 Oct. 2016 Environmental Protection Agency. “Heat Island Effect.” EPA. Environmental Protection Agency, 2 Sept. 2016. Web. 25 Oct. 2016. Liu, Zhifeng, Chunyang He, Yuyu Zhou, and Jianguo Wu. “How Much of the World’s Land Has Been Urbanized, Really? A Hierarchial Framework for Avoiding Confusion.” Landscape Ecology Landscape Ecol 29.5 (2014): 763-71. Web. 10 Oct. 2016
ARCHITECT@WORK Paris 2019
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ARCHITECT@WORK Paris 2019

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