Alison Brooks Architects references classic Berol Eagle pencil in design of mixed-use development
Paul Riddle

Alison Brooks Architects references classic Berol Eagle pencil in design of mixed-use development

26 Jun 2024  •  News  •  By Gerard McGuickin

One Ashley Road is a flagship project in the regeneration of Tottenham Hale in north London. Designed by the acclaimed London-based architectural studio Alison Brooks Architects, the project is a mixed-use development that is rooted in both community and place.

photo_credit Paul Riddle
Paul Riddle
photo_credit Alison Brooks Architects
Alison Brooks Architects

One Ashley Road was commissioned by Related Argent, a property developer and urban regeneration specialist. The project marks the gateway to “Heart of Hale”, a masterplan for Tottenham Hale that comprises new homes, retail, restaurants, cafes, office space, and more. Tottenham Hale underwent significant urbanization in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including the construction of many new factories and workhouses (the Eagle Pencil Company factory, maker of the classic Berol Eagle pencil, is one example). One Ashley Road is part of the large-scale redevelopment of the area, transforming a post-industrial and traffic-dominated transport hub into a livable neighborhood that improves quality of life for its residents.

photo_credit Alison Brooks Architects
Alison Brooks Architects
photo_credit Paul Riddle
Paul Riddle

The new development is made up of two residential towers that house 183 apartments set above three levels of retail and office space; the towers frame two sides of a courtyard block. “The design responds to the characteristics of the historic, existing, and emerging context,” says Alison Brooks Architects. “It defines the northern edge of a new transport interchange and acts as a threshold to a dynamic new neighborhood.” (One Ashley Road faces Tottenham Hale Tube, rail, and bus stations.) 

photo_credit Paul Riddle
Paul Riddle
photo_credit Paul Riddle
Paul Riddle

The development’s faceted form, pronounced verticality, and colonnade is rooted in place: The design references the area’s industrial past, most notably the adjacent Berol House (the former 1907 Eagle Pencil Company factory). One Ashley Road’s orange brick outer facade and metal inner skin is inspired by the graphic colors and hexagonal shape of the classic Berol Eagle pencil. “These have been translated formally as abstract surface patterns within the architecture of the building,” says Alison Brooks Architects. Moreover, a new pedestrian walkway connects One Ashley Road with the Berol House courtyard.

photo_credit Paul Riddle
Paul Riddle

The development’s stepped massing creates a private podium courtyard and co-working space for residents at the third-floor level as well as a communal roof garden on the seventh floor. The mid-rise scale helps to soften the transition between the two residential towers and the public realm. Shimmering, faceted rainscreen cladding and prefabricated, bolt-on balconies on the internal podium elevations reflect light into the raised courtyard. At street level, retail units are closed by stick curtain walling and triple-height entrance lobbies are bounded by a colonnade that buffers traffic and provides shelter.

photo_credit Paul Riddle
Paul Riddle
photo_credit Paul Riddle
Paul Riddle
photo_credit Paul Riddle
Paul Riddle

One Ashley Road’s location by a busy transport hub necessitated overcoming constraints posed by London Underground. The development’s design responds with considerable ingenuity to the presence of two Victoria line tunnels that run through the plot: “By strategically locating the two towers and their respective piling on either side of the tunnels, the project team navigated loading, acoustic, and vibration requirements from the London Underground infrastructure,” says Alison Brooks Architects.

photo_credit Alison Brooks Architects
Alison Brooks Architects

The stepped massing and communal green spaces are a result of this approach to the site’s unique conditions. These communal spaces provide residents with opportunities to socialize and enjoy a moment of outdoor respite.

photo_credit Paul Riddle
Paul Riddle
photo_credit Paul Riddle
Paul Riddle

 

Sustainability

One Ashley Road achieved a BREEAM “Very Good” rating and its operational carbon savings exceeded the Greater London Authority’s targets by 48 percent. The building’s embodied structural carbon is 168 kgCO2e/m2. The development is connected to a District Energy Network, helping to improve its environmental performance. Additional energy efficient strategies include the use of photovoltaic panels, smart metering, and energy management software. One Ashley Road’s construction also incorporates a highly-insulated building envelope. Its car parking is minimized due to the excellent transport links — there are just 11 disabled parking spaces.

photo_credit Paul Riddle
Paul Riddle

Stories: 20 and 14

183 apartments: 11 studios, 97 one-bed, 64 two-bed, 11 three-bed

Site size: 0.3188 ha (0.79 acres)

Size: 20,600 square meters (221,737 square feet)

Gross Internal Area: 18,784 square meters (202,189 square feet)

Residential Net Internal Area: 11,338 square meters (122,041 square feet)

 

“Alison Brooks on setting impossible design ambitions”

Listen to a conversation with Alison Brooks, Principal and Creative Director of Alison Brooks Architects, on the Archello Podcast