BIG designs four distinct penthouse homes on top of pixelated mountain

BIG designs four distinct penthouse homes on top of pixelated mountain

30 Oct 2019 News

The King Toronto development designed by Bjarke Ingels Group is a pixelated mixed use development placed around a public plaza. The building is organized as a perimeter block with a plaza in the center. The block is shaped like a mountain of undulating pixels that will create spaces for housing, retail and boutique offices. Each pixel is 45 degrees to increase light and air exposure.

King Toronto

The latest step in the design process are four distinct penthouses that form floating sanctuaries on top of the corners of the building. Essentially designed as a custom single family home inside the larger development, each will offer their distinct characteristic, themed as The Treehouse, La Bibliothèque, The Teahouse and The Greenhouse. The interiors are designed as a journey starting at the welcome lobby and ending in private roof terraces.

King Toronto

The Treehouse is characterized by an interior tree, an elegant curving stairs and brass kitchen.

Treehouse floorplan

La Bibliothèque features a two level brass bookshelf with a library curated by Taschen. 

La Bibliothèque

La Bibliothèque floorplan

The Teahouse holds a minimalistic tea room with a texture of warm hardwoods and glass blocks that form a beacon of light overlooking the city.

The Greenhouse is fitted with the most balconies and has a south facing greenhouse with plenty to support lush, thriving greenery.

Greenhouse floorplan

More from the Architects:

King Toronto is set in a transitional area of Toronto. From the tall towers of the Central Business District to the East, to the low-rise neighborhoods in the Northwest, the skyline is a mark of the city’s progress. Located at the meeting point of three 20th century neighborhood parks, BIG, Westbank and Allied propose a mixed use development with a public plaza that will create a new center for the community while connecting the various pedestrian pathways that crisscross the area.

King Toronto

The building is organized as a traditional perimeter block with a public plaza in the center. The plaza itself is defined by two distinct atmospheres: a lushly landscaped forest paired next to an urban, hardscaped court. The resulting balance between these perceived opposites is a reflection of Toronto’s current state of rapid redevelopment: the union of old and new, an open community atmosphere in an intimate setting, calming green scenery within a bustling urban context. Surrounding the plaza, King Toronto rises as sets of pixels extruded upwards to create space for housing, retail and boutique offices—avoiding the footprints of heritage buildings that already exist on the site.

King Toronto

Each pixel is set at the size of a room; rotated 45 degrees from the street grid to increase exposure to light and air. At the base, pixels lift to provide 24/7 access across the courtyard, while the roof surface is manipulated to allow sunlight to penetrate the entire building, creating space for green terraces attached to each unit.

King Toronto

The resulting undulating façade is a connective topography—allowing increased circulation through the neighborhood while creating an abundance of green space normally reserved for the suburbs.

King Toronto

“With King Toronto, we wanted to find an alternative to the tower and podium you see a lot of in Toronto and revisit some of Safdie’s revolutionary ideas, but rather than a utopian experiment on an island, have it nested into the heart of the city. It would be strange if one of the most diverse cities in the world had the most homogenous architecture.” Bjarke Ingels, Founding Partner, BIG.

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