Infill project in Brussels uses glass to create intriguing spatial transitions

Infill project in Brussels uses glass to create intriguing spatial transitions

9 Aug 2020 Materialization

In the centre of Brussels, an existing building from the beginning of the 20th century was located between two higher apartment buildings and forms part of a large urban building block. Filling the gap between the two higher apartments with an extension, dmvA Architecten have densified the site in harmony with the scale of its surroundings.  The urban infill portion includes a training centre and practice for advanced diagnostic imaging in dentistry and also serves as a home to the client.  

Credit: Sergio Pirrone

Making the most of its floor area, the different spaces inside the project can be used flexibly, making a combination of work and living uses possible. Spaces are able to transition with ease. For example, the training room on the third floor becomes a dining room and a kitchen in the evening, while the wine bar can be used also as a meeting room.

Credit: Sergio PIrrone

The façade of the extension is primarily glass, providing a great amount of transparency between the garden and the interior spaces. A guillotine screen on the garden side acts as a sun blind while a living screen on the street side improves sound regulation and air quality.

Credit: Sergio PIrrone

Beyond the extensive use of glass on the façade, it is also widely employed on the interior.  Via a glass floor between the dental practice and the classroom area, the practice can be observed from above during training.

Credit: Sergio PIrrone

 

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