The first phase of OMA and Jason Long’s historic POST Houston opens to the public

The first phase of OMA and Jason Long’s historic POST Houston opens to the public

23 Nov 2021 News

The first phase of the historic POST Houston by OMA and Jason Long has been completed. Open to the public for the first time, the former United States Post Office mail sorting warehouse has been relaunched as a cultural anchor and downtown destination for the city.

Leonid Furmansky

This first phase of the project includes three atriums (X,O, and Z) as well as the rooftop Skylawn. Bringing public life back to the building, the new atriums and roof garden can host a wide variety of programmatic events. Opening events included a car show, business expo, book launch, rave, yoga workout, film screening, and a bustling market of over 30 food vendors and retailers.

Leonid Furmansky

The facility’s ability to host such a diverse range of programmes reflects on the long term aim of the project to evolve alongside Houston as it continues to grow and change as a city not only demographically but also economically, socially, and culturally. 

Working with the urban context, OMA ‘raked’ a series of horizontal thoroughfares through the existing postal sorting building. Three interior voids bring light deep into the building’s floor plates which include a commercial ground plane, offices at the second level, and a 6-acre rooftop park.  

Leonid Furmansky

Each of the three atriums contains a monumental staircase that connects the ground plane to the roofscape and its spectacular vistas. Each stair is distinct in character, structure and material, however, all are designed to foster social interaction with their broad, intertwined paths.

Scott Shigley

POST Market, a large food hall, is located in the O-Atrium. Mirroring the diversity of Houston’s food scene, the market includes a series of stainless steel elements including seating, counters, kitchens, and floating mesh halo. With vendors organized from small to large (grab-and-go kiosks to fine dining) varying shapes and orientations create a dense matrix punctuated by unexpected clearings and view corridors.

Scott Shigley

At the centre of the kiosk area, two stairs wound together like a spring connect hall to the 170,000 square foot POST Houston rooftop where there are expansive downtown views. In addition to two restaurants, the roofscape also accommodates a ‘Texas-sized’ urban farm along with shaded gardens, recreational areas, and a landscaped grove. 

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