Fort 137: A Desert Oasis of Integrated Luxury
Stetson Ybarra

Fort 137: A Desert Oasis of Integrated Luxury

Daniel Joseph Chenin 建築家 として

Daniel Joseph Chenin, Ltd., an award-winning, multi-disciplinary design studio fostering an integrated and cinematic approach to architecture, is proud to unveil Fort 137, a desert oasis on the edge of the Las Vegas Valley offering panoramic views of surrounding Red Rock Canyon, and bordering government-protected land. The completed project has already garnered numerous industry awards and accolades for its thoughtful and innovative design, including multiple Architizer A+Awards in 2022.

photo_credit Stephen Morgan
Stephen Morgan
photo_credit Stephen Morgan
Stephen Morgan

Commissioned for a family embracing an active lifestyle of immersive environmental experiences, the firm was tasked with creating a home that would be contemporary and warm, yet seamlessly blended into the rugged beauty of its natural surroundings. In addition to an interior program that included a primary suite, a secondary suite, three additional bedrooms, and a large communal living and dining space, the 15-month build prioritized an external focus that includes an entry rotunda, a shaded courtyard, and a view frame overlooking the surrounding landscape.

photo_credit Stetson Ybarra
Stetson Ybarra
photo_credit Stephen Morgan
Stephen Morgan

“The client is from out of state, and we were selected for our ability to provide a complete turnkey project,” explains Daniel Joseph Chenin, lead architect and founder of the firm bearing his name. “We provided all of the architecture and interior design, right down to the design, selection, procurement, and installation of the furniture, fixtures, and accessories.”

photo_credit Daniel Joseph Chenin
Daniel Joseph Chenin
photo_credit Daniel Joseph Chenin
Daniel Joseph Chenin

Fort 137’s entry rotunda characterizes the firm’s experiential approach, with a modern interpretation paying homage to the old fort structures of early settlements that once dotted the desert landscape of the Las Vegas Valley. The rotunda, rising 28 feet, serves as a transition between the external desert heat and the cooler interior, with a conical shape that contrasts with the straight lines of the living spaces. Upon entering the rotunda, the sound of running water from the lower level’s stone fountain transitions mindsets from the arid desert heat to one of a cooling desert mirage, and a winding staircase provides access to a rooftop lounge outfitted with a firepit and expansive desert views.

photo_credit Stetson Ybarra
Stetson Ybarra
photo_credit Stetson Ybarra
Stetson Ybarra

“In researching architecture that addresses the hot and arid climate of the southwest, it took us back to some of the settlement structures of the pioneers of the 1800s,” says Chenin. “The idea of a stacked, rock structure, similar to forts designed by the settlers of the time, really resonated.”

photo_credit Stetson Ybarra
Stetson Ybarra
photo_credit Stetson Ybarra
Stetson Ybarra

After a cool respite, the rotunda ushers you back into the desert climate of an internal courtyard that transitions across the blurred lines that blend the home into its surrounding natural environment. The transition from the external desert to the home’s interior begins with a fully-enclosed, shaded courtyard area that is ideal for family meals and gatherings, set against a backdrop that includes a 75-ton boulder that was excavated from the site. Inside the home, two dually-purposed flanking walls run from north to south, providing protection against external elements, while also defining the boundaries of the layout. Between the walls, gathering spaces include a large lounge area and dining room, a kitchen, an office, and a theater room, while more intimate spaces, including the bedrooms, are located on the outer sides of the walls.

photo_credit Stephen Morgan
Stephen Morgan
photo_credit Stephen Morgan
Stephen Morgan

The living spaces of Fort 137 are laid out in three complementary volumes, each designed to maximize comfort, efficiency, and ambiance. Within a steel frame and stone walls, sliding glass panel walls, 38 feet long by 13 feet high, provide panoramic views from both the north and south facades. The glass walls also serve multiple purposes and are positioned to provide cross-ventilation and to draw abundant sunlight into an interior designed with angular precision to offer protection against the harshest occurrences of desert sun and wind.

photo_credit Stephen Morgan
Stephen Morgan
photo_credit Stetson Ybarra
Stetson Ybarra

The central flow of the interior’s open living and dining area gives way to an adjoining sub-set of more intimate and private zones, including bedrooms and servicing areas. Each space, from its orientation to its comforts, is designed for tranquil moments alone, or for quiet moments spent with guests. The modest luxury of the modern interior is framed by travertine floors, stucco ceilings, and reconstituted wood veneer vertical panels, providing a warm embrace for the curated furnishings and art selections of Daniel Joseph Chenin. Stone, wood, and brass details are abundant, including in the interior’s custom door handles and detailed cabinetry.

photo_credit Stetson Ybarra
Stetson Ybarra
photo_credit Daniel Joseph Chenin
Daniel Joseph Chenin

“The project is robust and rough on the outside, and refined and detailed on the inside,” concludes Daniel Joseph Chenin. “But the lines are blurred by the singular vision of each element, including the mimicking of colors and textures that reflect the surrounding context of the Red Rock mountains.”

photo_credit Daniel Joseph Chenin
Daniel Joseph Chenin
photo_credit Stetson Ybarra
Stetson Ybarra

In addition to hitting its mark as an integrated oasis of comfort and serenity in the desert valley, Fort 137 was built with limited environmental impacts. Daniel Joseph Chenin incorporated numerous design strategies into the project to offset the home’s carbon footprint and reduce its dependence on the grid, including a photovoltaic panel infrastructure and ballast roofing that complement other design elements along with passive cooling, thermal mass, and radiant heating. Other sustainable considerations include a reconstituted wood veneer derived from the biproduct and waste of a sawmill, as well as locally-sourced materials, and constructively repurposed rocks and earth extracted from the building site. Furthermore, materials including weathered steel, hot rolled steel, and travertine were procured for their ability to age and patina with the desert sands of time, adding further color and textures to a built environment destined to integrate even deeper into its natural surroundings.

photo_credit Daniel Joseph Chenin
Daniel Joseph Chenin
photo_credit Stephen Morgan
Stephen Morgan

Team:

Project Team: Daniel Joseph Chenin, Eric Weeks, Kevin Welch, Esther Chung, Jose Ruiz, Grace Ko, Alberto Sanchez, Debra Ackermann, Julie Nelson 

Contractor: Forté Specialty Contractors

Civil Engineer: McCay Engineering

Landscape Architect: Vangson Consulting, LLC

Structural Engineer: Vector Structural Engineering

Mechanical, Electrical & Plumbing: Engineering Partners, Inc.

Photo Credits: Stetson Ybarra, Stephen Morgan, Daniel Joseph Chenin

photo_credit Stetson Ybarra
Stetson Ybarra
photo_credit Stephen Morgan
Stephen Morgan

Materials Used:

Pool & Water Features: Ozzie Kraft Custom Pools

Millwork Design; Daniel Joseph Chenin, Ltd.

Furniture Fixtures & Accessories: Daniel Joseph Chenin, Ltd.

Art Consultant: Daniel Fine Art Services

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