Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects Inc
Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects Inc

Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects Inc

Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects is at the forefront of architectural design practices that are redefining relationships between architecture, housing, and the city. The firm’s multi-family projects are noted for clarity of vision, crisp forms, coherent building systems, site integration, and material innovation. Led by Stanley Saitowitz, the practice is committed to the design and construction of projects which engage their context and community through a focused exploration of movement and perception. With the belief that architecture can play a role in shaping how we experience the built environment, this work has forged new relationships and catalyzed change across a range of scales, programs, and contexts from compact Type V infill housing on SOMA alleys such as Natoma, Tehama, and Clara, to Type I high rises such as Blanc on Nob Hill, the interiors of Jasper on Rincon Hill, and the common spaces of the W Hotel near the Yerba Buena Gardens. Stanley Saitowitz was born in Johannesburg, South Africa and received his Bachelor of Architecture at the University of Witwatersrand in 1974 and his Masters in Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley in 1977. He is an Emeritus Professor of Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley. He has taught at numerous schools, including the Elliot Noyes Professor, Harvard University GSD (1991-2), the Bruce Goff Professor, University of Norman, Oklahoma (1993), UCLA, Rice, SCIARC, Cornell, Syracuse, and University of Texas at Austin. He has given more than 200 public lectures in the United States and abroad. His first house was built in 1975, and together with Stanley Saitowitz/Natoma Architects Inc., has completed numerous buildings and projects. These have been residential, commercial and institutional. He has designed houses, housing, master plans, offices, museums, libraries, wineries, synagogues, churches, commercial and residential interiors, memorials, urban landscapes and promenades. Amongst many awards, the Transvaal House was declared a National Monument by the Monuments Council in South Africa in 1997, the New England Holocaust Memorial received the Henry Bacon Medal in 1998, and in 2006 he was a finalist for the Smithsonian Cooper Hewitt National Design Award given by Laura Bush at the White House. Three books have been published on the work, and articles have appeared in many magazines and newspapers. His paintings, drawings and models have been exhibited in numerous galleries and museums.