Hi-Lo Store

Hi-Lo Store

Architect
David Guerra Architecture and Interior
Location
Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Project Year
2011
Category
Showrooms
Jomar Bragança

Hi-Lo Store

David Guerra Architecture and Interior as Architects

The site used to be a beachwear store, later; it came through a reconstruction to be a store for men, which changed many things. After this reconstruction, the place became an outlet, without any concern for aesthetics. Due to extensive damage, it took nearly 2 years to find someone interested on renting it, even if it was a privileged location. “When my customers asked me to help them finding a place, on April 2010, I confess I became a little bit apprehensive: the store was between two others, in the back of the site. Even the customers took time to decide, only on December they rented the place and I started making the design”.

 

The customers wanted a store with a romantic characteristic, but in a modern interpretation. A delicate store, smooth, feminine, which makes the clients feel comfortable and, at the same time, feel the seduction, glamour and passion environment, giving the store two sides: the romantic and the seductive. The HI-LO is a store of clothing and accessories, which follows the High & Low style, characterized by the mix of opposite items from recognized and conceptual brands, mixed with young brands and basic items for the day-by-day. The architecture follows the same concept, making the architecture translates it and relates the low with romanticism and high with passion, desire and seduction.

 

The clothing store follows the High and Low style, in a mix of opposites with recognized, young, conceptual and basic brands. The concept extends for the interior architecture, in a contrast of colors, materials and sensations. The front view, in latticework 40x40cm, has a metallic pinky red beam. In the area of clothing exposition, the architect explored the concepts of lightness and romanticism by using the colors white, silver and dry golden. Contrasts between French wallpapers on the screens, the buttoned fabric and the work in lace-trimmed on the wall, make the environment gentle for choosing clothes. In the dressing-rooms area, the red and pink colors assume the role of seduction, glamour, passion and sensuality, the transformation of a star. Every star has a stage. Red curtains, buttoned panels, indirect lightning, multiple mirrors, satin sofa, vintage chandelier and bookshelf with stylist feet create a scenario, where the protagonist is the customer.

 

The design uses materials that explore the High and Low concept, so, at the same time, you can see recycled materials and lower price, as the chandelier and the Tetra Pak panel, and you can see chic products, such as the French wallpaper. Keeping the concept of the store, the design explores the neutral colors, contrasting with the red variations, giving values to the simple and sophisticated. 


Material used:


1. Façade covered in latticework 40x40cm, painted in white. Stairs and footers are in São Gabriel

granite. The façade is then completed with the metallic pink-red beam.

2. Rolled tread made of PVC. Right screen designed by the architect in a French colonial style,

covered by French wallpaper, with a floral pattern.

3. . Curved back wall covered by lace trimmed work, made of Tetra Park boxes by the artist Léo Pilló.

4. Screen table in white lacquer designed by the architect.

5. Clothes rack in steel, painted with automotive paint.

6. Bookshelf in French colonial style and drawer are designed by the architect.

7. Sofa made in satin.

8. Dressers in red buttoned panels, stools covered with velvet fabric and curtains made of silk fabric.

9. Side table in French colonial style and the wardrobe in the back are designed by the architect.

10. Chandelier hand painted by the artist Tereza Motta.

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