Henri Dutilleux Conservatoire

Henri Dutilleux Conservatoire

Architect
Dominique Coulon & associés
Location
Belfort, France
Project Year
2015
Category
Concert Halls


Cultural Centres


Theaters
Stories By
Dominique Coulon & associés


Jung
Eugeni Pons
Product Spec Sheet
RoleBrandsProducts Used
ManufacturersJungLS 990
Concrete StructureAlbizzati Pere and Fils
metalworksAntonietti
Plombing and drainageBeyler
PlasteringCurti
Concrete screedDe Stefano

‘Henri Dutilleux’ Conservatoire of Music, Dance and Dramatic Arts

Dominique Coulon & associés as Architects

‘Henri Dutilleux’ Conservatoire of Music, Dance and Dramatic Arts, Belfort


The building is located in the upper part of the town. It backs onto the woods, forming the final outlying limit of the built-up area. Echoing the open landscape, it faces to Belfort Lion on the hilltop opposite. In this strong context, the building offers its solidity, an almost opaque mass of grey concrete. The surface of the mass has an unusual texture, hinting at plants or the veins in marble. It has been achieved by drip painting in two shades of blue. The drips of paint lend depth and thickness to the skin of the building. The surfaces vibrate in the light, apparently in motion – matter ceases to be static.


The concrete monolith exudes an enigmatic presence. Only the volume of the dance room seems to be looking at the Lion, constructed in 1879 as a symbol of resistance to the enemy. The building condenses a programme with very varied volumes. The building contains two auditoriums, a theatre, a large dance room, a library, classrooms, administrative offices, and a host of studios with very varied volumes and areas. The acoustic of each studio is designed to suit one specific instrument. The areas appear to fit into each other. Empty areas are hollowed out of this compact mass, creating relationships between the different levels. The entrance hall is on an unexpected scale. The library seems to be suspended, marking out the cross-section and serving as a giant deflector. The central patio is the darkest area. Its colour and its negative drip design reverse the codes of the outer envelope. It is the ultimate expression of density.


Monolith with drip painting

Jung as Manufacturers

Inspired by the works of American abstract expressionist Jackson Pollock, who poured and threw paint onto canvases, the surface of this building’s mass has an unusual texture achieved by drip painting in two shades of blue. The drips of paint give depth and thickness to the skin of the building.


The drip painting artwork was undertaken by artists Gabriel Khokha and Max Colour. Like Pollock, the artists developed their own technique of abstract painting. Here, the pair created their own unique paintbrushes for the paint splattering task, practising on buildings awaiting demolition and using a mobile crane from which to throw paint at building walls.


More from the Manufacturer:


The building is located in the upper part of the town. It backs onto the woods, forming the final outlying limit of the built-up area. Echoing the open landscape, it faces to Belfort Lion on the hilltop opposite. In this strong context, the building offers its solidity, an almost opaque mass of grey concrete. The surface of the mass has an unusual texture, hinting at plants or the veins in marble. It has been achieved by drip painting in two shades of blue. The drips of paint lend depth and thickness to the skin of the building. The surfaces vibrate in the light, apparently in motion – matter ceases to be static.


The concrete monolith exudes an enigmatic presence. Only the volume of the dance room seems to be looking at the Lion, constructed in 1879 as a symbol of resistance to the enemy. The building condenses a programme with very varied volumes. The building contains two auditoriums, a theatre, a large dance room, a library, classrooms, administrative offices, and a host of studios with very varied volumes and areas. The acoustic of each studio is designed to suit one specific instrument. The areas appear to fit into each other. Empty areas are hollowed out of this compact mass, creating relationships between the different levels. The entrance hall is on an unexpected scale. The library seems to be suspended, marking out the cross-section and serving as a giant deflector. The central patio is the darkest area. Its colour and its negative drip design reverse the codes of the outer envelope. It is the ultimate expression of density.

Products used in this project
Chips
next project

Chips

Housing and Private Houses
Manchester, United Kingdom - Build completed in 2009
View Project
Archello

Want to see more like this?

Subscribe to Archello's newsletter