MAGOK LAKEPARK

MAGOK LAKEPARK

Architect
External Reference
Location
Seoul, South Korea
Project Year
2008
Category
Parks/Gardens

Parks

Pavilions

MAGOK LAKEPARK

External Reference as Architects

Type of project: Masterplan, Landscape design Project: Magok Lakepark, sustainable water park, yacht marina, housing, convention center, hotels, Spa Location: Seoul, Korea Status: Competition Handing over date of project: June, 2008 Client: Seoul Metropolitan Government Built up area: 1.170.000 m2 Project team: Nacho Toribio, Carmelo Zappulla with Esther Rovira, Massimo Tepedino, Cristian Suau, Phil Henshaw, Kevin Hong, Tudor Vlasceanu. Collaborators: Marina Cella, Santiago Marresa , Young-soon AHN, Indre grybauskiene, Ji Yang Kim, Pedro Viana, Mara Norite, Matt Bell, Pedro brandao. Budget: 102.300.000 $


I. MAGOK WATERFRONT


Beginning of the 21st century has already indicated the tremendous levels of change in urban Korea. Development with many external cultural influences has accelerated to the levels unseen before.


This raises a number of interrelated questions, such as: - How are urban parks in Korea changing? - What are the sustainable paths towards the development of an urban leisure space in Seoul: mixed use or urban disorder? - How can we identify and manifest Korean values into an urban waterfront? - What is the formation and attitude of a urban wetland? - How an urban wetland can become a park?


Our proposal is to form a territory of co-existence between nature and artificiality.


From its largest context as the first site of the Han River Renaissance Project to its desires to transform the area of Magok, a strong identity strategy is proposed through waterscapes, transport structures and building types.


Underlying the strategy and form throughout the site is the development of eco-formations. These creations of land manipulation both consider the requirements of promoting waterfront ecology with leisure and park amenities. They perform environmentally through water terracing and an informality of leisure space through a substantial wetlands network.


With so much transport and services infrastructures currently being implemented into the site, we looked to take a direct and pragmatic approach to utilizing the given networks. We acknowledge and highlight the importance of local, national and international transport links as fundamental in the design of such a strategic urban structure.


II. WATERSCAPES Inhabiting Korean formations in a remote lake


1. Connections


Between the site and the Han River sits Olympic Expressway and fundamental to our proposal is to form a strong connection with the river. We propose to alter this expressway barrier and provide direct leisure access and water management to Han River in form of a Barrage, sluice gates and fish pass.


The significance of this barrage allows for the waterscapes and jetties forming a controlled waterfront landscape. The symbolic significance of having physical water access is integral to creating a sustaining identity for Magok as a waterfront leisure destination.


Further to the connection from the Han River is the connection between the north and south lakes. From the Yangcheon-gil road, a floodgate, sluice and fish pass is also proposed to accommodate the level difference as and to create further links into the site right up to the transport link at rail station 905 along line No. 9.


2. Wetlands


Along the shoreline of the lake park a substantial amount of the scheme considers the use of wetlands not only in promoting the environmental benefits but also as a transition between land and water. The consideration is that the shoreline designation will fluctuate with rainfall and other factors to form a localized habitat that will have direct access with close proximity to the urban surroundings. This juxtaposition of wetlands and urban context establishes an opportunity in creating a progressive and distinct character. Korean landscape: Between wood, water and formations


3. Water Terracing


The central theme of waterfront forms a series of waterscapes systems within the site. Taking account of strategic site levels and the need for an urban ecology, water-terracing systems are used to form a systematic structure for implementation. These terracing elements, acting as the surface water treatment system, give visual and dynamic clarity as to the identity for Magok.


III. WATER TREATMENT MANAGEMENT IN MAGOK


The River Barrage construction is a key project in the regeneration of Magok Waterfront. This major civil engineering project will establish a freshwater lake that will be the catalyst for regeneration of the entire area. The Barrage would be operated and maintained by Magok harbour authority staff 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.


The change from saline to freshwater in the Bay will create a unique environment, which will provide the Harbour Authority with a range of environmental challenges and conservation development opportunities.


1. The River Barrage


• It incorporates three sluice gates, which would allow drain down of impoundment over one tidal cycle in an emergency. • It includes two locks for vessel navigation to/from the Magok river. • It incorporates a state of the art fish pass, which would allow migratory fish to pass in/out of the lakes at all stages of tidal variation. • It acts as a flood defence to the Magok area. • It would provide tastefully landscaped open space.


2. Environmental Management: Dissolved Oxygen


Ideally the lakes would require the dissolved oxygen level within the impoundment to be maintained at or above 5mg/l in all places and at all times. The 100%ile dissolved oxygen standard would be maintained using water mixing system comprising:


• A main network of 50mm diameter. R13 self-sinking armoured rubber pipes. • Webbing of 14mm dia. armoured rubber pipe. • Four compressor stations containing a total of 32 Rietschle DLR100 Zephyr compressors. • Over 300 diffuser heads incorporating unique patented airflow regulators ensuring even release of air from each diffuser irrespective of water depth and distance from a compressor house. • If it becomes necessary to add oxygen to the water an oxygenation barge capable of injecting 400Kg oxygen per hour from an on-board 5 Tonne capacity liquid oxygen storage vessel can be used.


3. Water Quality Monitoring


A comprehensive water quality-monitoring programme will be set in place. It consists of 24/7 electronic data acquisition for dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, conductivity and turbidity at 15 minutes intervals from several monitoring stations. Data will be telemetered to the Magok Harbour Authority office on an hourly basis.


The water quality monitoring deals with conventional laboratory analysis of water nutrients, algal chlorophyll, hardness, some metals and BOD on a monthly basis. E.coli and Faecal streptococci enumeration could be undertaken at 8 sites twice weekly in summer and weekly in winter to inform water recreation users.


4. Debris/Litter Management


Debris deposited in the area each year by the Magok River and the main basins can be collected and disposed of on a daily basis. Waste would be removed from the water using a purpose-made vessel, a floating bulldozer called a Waterwitch, which has a one tonne scoop lifting capacity. Land-based teams would then collect debris from areas inaccessible to the water witch. The collected debris can be separated wherever possible for recycling purposes. Of this litter and debris, clean and bulky timber can be used as fuel for a Biomass Boiler at the Harbour.


5. Han River Intrusion


A standard of low salinity within the inner lakes would be maintained to protect freshwater ecology. River water entering the Magok reservoir via locking operations would be contained within a constructed underwater 'sump' immediately lakeside of the locks. A 1200mm diameter pipe with integral butterfly valve (to regulate water flow) would return water from the base of the sump to the outer barrage side (Han River). Management of use of the pipe is informed by telemetered data from four datasondes suspended through the water column in the sump. Any river water incursion occurring through sluice structures or fish pass is detected by data sondes at 1m and 4m above bed level immediately Lake side of the sluices. If salt is detected it is dissipated by mixing using air emerging from an array of diffuser heads (not part of the general inner basins mixing system).


6. Migratory Fish


A migratory fish-monitoring programme can be set up. Native fish stocks can be monitored and maintained. A state of the art fish pass incorporated into the barrage structure will allow migratory fish to pass in/out of the Bay at all stages of tidal variation.


7. Aquatic Weed Management Pest


Conditions within the creeks channels, wetlands and inner lakes margins are favourable for the growth of aquatic weed. A purpose built amphibious vessel would be deployed for cutting weeds to a maximum depth of 1.5 metres to maintain navigable channels and also allow access to shallow areas for litter control that would otherwise be inaccessible to conventional craft.


8. Wetlands Reserve


Magok Waterfront can be undertaken to further enhance the habitats for birds and fish, and a thriving ecosystem can be established in the south and north basin. The prime conservation area within the lakes will be the wetlands.


These marsh zones will be constructed and managed to maximise the potential for roosting and breeding birds. Their management will promote a steady change from saline to freshwater plants. This will support a diverse population of plants, insects, amphibians and mammals.


IV. TRANSPORT STRUCTURES


In principle the urban structures respond systematically to the main transport stations linking Seoul city centre and both Gimpo and Incheon international airports. From these main attractors, a network is formed as a body conditioned to the specific site and local commerce.


1. Roads


A. Relationship between the straight and undulating roads


Along with the current large scale transport infrastructure being undertaken, we look to the condition of the Olympic Expressway with the site as key to establishing a strong riverfront presence. Without disturbing the flow of the expressway, we look to create direct visual access to the Han River. By creating a road intersection from the Expressway to the western edge of the site, we propose reconfiguring Olympic Expressway underground to allow for visual and pedestrian access directly to the river's edge.


Primarily, this strategy allows for the Barrage to operate as a lifeline providing water management and access from the river to the proposed lake.


B. Non-imposing road grid but a scenic by prioritising the natural environment


There is a hierarchy of roads implemented within the site and link to existing infrastructure surrounding the site. The included on the road plan areas, which should provide pedestrian priority/traffic. The way in which we deal with these boundaries and edges will be the key to the success of the scheme. In addition the internal road subsystem encourages slow-speed streets.


Specifically, the road system varies from 6 lane connections in the 'Olympic Expressway' to 2 lanes that reach deep into the more watery areas of our development. The roads that meet water will become 'Jetty Settlements'; suspended pier/jetty-like road structures that tread lightly over the lily pads and enable programme to spread over the water.


Responding to the already planned urban development surrounding Magok, we incorporating a local network of pedestrian & cycle, vehicle and water circulations to maintain flow and allow for transparency into the site. From the Han River, there are circulation routes, which are highlighted by attractors such as the Cultural zone, development stripes, jetty and high rise settlements, and recreational centres.


2. Bike Network


A integrated, comprehensive cycle network is proposed throughout the site. The main circuit follows the shoreline of the two lakes linking all programs. Secondary paths branch off to connect directly to strategic links within each zone. These consider the other transport links in which generous, traffic-free pathways will encourage cycling as the most efficient method of accessing the site. The network program is designed to provide experience through different landscapes and programs. With the water terracing and earth forming, there will be gentle gradients along with varying ecologies from cycling through wetlands to connections with urban train hubs to direct link to bordering street network. In penetrating the site, it will be encouraged to use cycling as the most efficient method. A proposal for a cycle rental network of 'pay as you go' is implemented in strategic locations. This system is seen as both for leisure use and for those working in the site and surrounding areas. A strategic framework will be developed along with any development guidelines produced for the site.


3. Public Transport


A. Over-ground Transport Bus With such important transport infrastructure running through the site and following the internal connection roads, a local bus service is proposed. It is envisaged that these provide the local chain directly forming a link with both Gimpo and Incheon International Airports. Through connections to the train stations, the bus links will not only provide service for tourists but act as integrated into the other local systems.


B. Water Bus It is a public transport in connection to bus stops and bike parking. There is a fleet of two water buses. The boats will have protection against unpredictable weather and large opening windows to make the most of fine days. There are 3 stations along the Magok Waterfront: Convention Center (south side); Old Pump Station and The Barrage (north side).


V. ECO - FORMATIONS


The coexistence of nature and artificiality allows opportunity to have a series of 'eco formations'. These wetland formations operated as double uses, on the one hand providing recreation and amenities to the site but also performing as active ecological systems of water purification.


For example, in the form of biotypes of flora and fauna, land reclamation forms and terracing surface water treatment filtration. This pragmatic approach provides this opportunity to form a landscape infrastructure.


1. Eco-Cells The base layer of Magok Waterfront is composed of man-made formations that identify concavities and convexities in the proposed landscape, a sweeping topography of hills and craters. Using bulldozers these forms would be constructed into terraces up or down similar to land fill sites, copper quarries, etc. The cells will create a dramatic environment reminiscent of flooding rice fields. The intention is that the formations are not finalised shapes but platforms for future developments. Each formation is unique and will have multi-purposes ranging from landscapes that fold and bridge over roads to new parkland.


2. Wetland terraces


Connecting this terracing section is the hydro-oxygenation farm system. This unique ecology distinguishes platforms linking one to another and serving as a purification and drainage mechanism. These wetland terraces become particularly dense against the periphery of the south side where the creeks end. The surface water is filtered and purified in each eco-buffer.


VI. MANGOK LANDSCAPE STRATEGY


The improvement of environmental conditions is essential for the implantation of the project. The colonization of the shores of tributary of Han River and the recreational and sporting use of its waters entails the need for a comprehensive treatment for them to adjust the quality to its use. The strategy of generating landscape starts of a unit, an octagonal cell, organised to purify water to be used in its interior. The amount of specific treated water drained towards the basins contributes to the improvement of environmental water surface and therefore the Han River. The urban fabric resulting that forms the shores of the river is the result of the addition of these cellular units differentiated by the programme, weaving a body through an infrastructure catchments, treatment and draining of water and other infrastructure in overlaying uses, etc. The very logic of the movement of water by gravity originates or staged terraced topographies in cellular and global scale.


1. Water Treatment


The treatment of the water is carried out in three levels: • Previous Treatment of waters of the 3 smaller creeks to its opening in basin superior • Reed beds (reed beds) in the two basins like treatment of support for the improvement of the quality of its waters • Purification in each cell


All the proposed treatments share the fact of being based on systems of beds of macrophyte beds or vegetal filters. The previous and precise treatments work by means of a system of vertical circulation (vertical flow) whereas the surrounding reed beds do it by means of horizontal circulation (horizontal flow). First it consists of primary treatment (gravel filter) that retains the solid matters in suspension in the water (suspended solids separation), secondary treatment by means of a system of lagooning separated in diverse channels and slope pools established with reed beds that makes circulate the water slowly and create the necessary conditions so that bacteria eliminate the dissolved organic matter. Oxygen recovers airing by gravity with small water jumps. The tertiary treatment is partly made through consumption of Nitrogen and Phosphorus in the pool of final storage (floating plants in small masses) that can perform as swimming pool and by the spill of this water in natural substrate by means of irrigation (irrigation). The solar radiation also enables the disappearance of bacteria in the storage pools.


The second, planted on gravel substrate in the edges of basins, makes a secondary and tertiary treatment when penetrate and freely leave the water in these reed beds.


The strategy of water recycling on global scale:


- Optimal water treatment for bath - Optimal water treatment for irrigation - Optimal water treatment for its reusability in construction like water supply of cisterns of WC, washing and dish washing machines, etc - Gray water purification of the new houses with as opposed to basins - Improvement of the quality of the water of basins for recreational use (navigation) - Treatment of the water of run-off of the hill of the east - Purification of activated mud of the plant of pre-existing water purification.


2. Drainage


The drainage of the water treated and stored in the pools and the originating one of the tertiary treatment is transported through an open canal with vegetation emulating a forest of gallery towards stores depots for its use in the construction, until other zones of irrigation or it is spilled improved directly to basins.


3. Vegetation


The logic imposes criteria of election of own native species of biotope. The scopes of plantation are distinguished to each other fundamentally by their relation with the water: riparian vegetation, masses of outer reed beds, systematized reed beds of precise treatments (inner reed beds), floating vegetation, gallery forest (drainage corridors vegetation), gardens (recreational vegetation).


3.1. Outer reed beds In these reed beds of horizontal circulation (horizontal flow systems) macrophytes species with sensible seasonal changes of appearance are chosen: - Miscanthus Sacchariflorus - Phalaris Arundinacea - Sparganium Sp. - Typha Orientalis


3.2. Riparian vegetation It is tried as opposed to create a continuous edge of masses of Salix like stabilizers of specks of protection floods and wind fences: -Salix Gacilistyla -Salix Koreensis -Salix Matsudana -Salix Purpurea


3.3. Inner reed beds The macrophytes chosen for the vegetal filters systematized are those that have demonstrated to obtain to better qualities in he himself space and time of treatment: - Phragmites Australis - Phragmites Japonica - Iris Pseudacorus


3.4. Drainage corridors vegetation The species that accompany the channel by superficial drainage create a shaded and fresh runner causing the establishment and shelter of own native species of this biotope: -Ulmus Davidiana Japonica (25%) -Polulus Euroamericana (60%) -Zelkova Serrata (5%) -Sophora Japonica(10%)


3.5. Floating vegetation In the storage pools that can work as open swimming pools appear small masses of floating vegetation that helps to fix part of Nitrogen (N) and Phosphorus (P)


3.6. Recreational vegetation Similar to a gardening programme applied in several cellular units, the aim is to establish tree species of trees with flowers and fruits, more sensible to the wind condition and well protected in the interiors: -Prunus Avium -Prunus Cerasifera -Prunus Serrulata -Magnolia Grandiflora


VII. BUILDING TYPES


1. Tower Vertical Formations High rise + High dense Housing/Hotel/Office Located next the Han River these form a strong presence along the riverfront. Composing itself next to Mt. Gung and the existing high-rise apartment blocks, the gateway settlement consists of mixed-use towers, which act as a 'gateway' marker into the site. Along with possible residential accommodation, the adjacent Barrage and recreational facilities creates a vibrant ensemble for the riverfront.


2. Jetty Structures Variable rise + Low-dense Marinas/Clubs/Restaurants


Utilizing the lake, these proposed jetties form a series of 'water plots' for residential development and amenity use. Similar to marina type living, these floating jetties consider the joy of living near water. The vision for the jetties is one of diversity where more independent development would be encouraged to create a visual tapestry of buildings and amenity uses. The goal is that they begin to develop their own characteristics and identity in reflecting all, which comes with inhabitation.


3. Development Stripes Mid-rise + Mid-dense Commercial/Cultural/Leisure


From the larger Magok Development site and the new transport link at 905 Station along subway line 9, these areas allow for the city to infiltrate into the site. Taking strategic moves from the proposed Exhibition facilities complex to the edge of the infrastructural facilities of zone E, a series of development stripes are allocated. Without prescriptive intervention, we would formulate a design guide where mid-rise development with emphasis on retail and commercial sits adjacent to transport hubs. Possibilities are corporate office development, restaurants, retail department stores and small business shop owners. The development stripes are also 'local gateways' which allow permeability into the site with continuity of green stripes located intermittently. The importance of these stripes is they assist in creating local users and tourist for activating the landscape and waterscapes.


VIII. ZONES


ZONE A: THE BARRAGE


Zone A is the Barrage. It is mainly the link between Magok Waterfront (Magok Reservoir) and the Han River. The design of the Barrage is based on a detailed analysis of the height difference of the river bank, height differences of the new waterway and Lake Park, and the management relating to the water supply and water quality.


1. Design Factors


1. The sewer lines lain along the Olympic Expressway have been adjusted to 0.5m for the entering of ships. 2. The Han River's highest water level (200 years frequency) is +12.31m, and the Olympic Expressway riverbank is approximately +14.00m. The managed water level of the Magok Waterfront for flood control is about 3.70m - 6.00m.


2. Design Criteria


The location, shape, size, and design of the Barrage (or floodgate) takes into account urban/aquatic communication; safety and amenities. The Barrage constitutes a landmark, which provides distinctiveness and symbolism. It consists of a double layered floodgate.


The Barrage is designed so that the normal water level of the Han River is equal to the water level of the entire waterfront.


The Barrage is able to prevent the backflow of water 3.70m above the normal water level in times of heavy rain and increased water level. Vessels are not allowed to operate during heavy rainfall.


The design criteria for the Barrage has taken into account the following factors: A. Tidal water levels B. Height of the lower slab of the Incheon International Airport Railroad structure (22.50m) C. Access for large vessel sizing (i.e.: Catamaran’s mast height plus hull) D. 100% circulation of the Olympic Expressway without interruptions


Therefore, the initial option of elevating the Olympic Expressway is simply impossible. The feasible option is to design a subterranean pass of the Olympic Expressway along the Zone A. The construction of a new pump station on the Barrage, between sluices and locks, is required.


As result the Barrage is the strategic piece of the Magok Waterfront, the waterway gate that directly connects to the Han River. On surface level (approx. 14.00m), there are an internal road, pedestrian and bicycle path along the dyke of the Han River.


3. The Barrage’s main parts


3.1. Internal road - bascule bridges The internal road is a surface transport consisting of two lanes each sense. Two bascule bridges, one for each lock, allow traffic across the road when the locks are closed. They weight approximately 80 tonnes and use a counterweight to save energy during operations.


3.2. Locks - sluices - pump - fish pass The floodgate consists of 2 locks on the Barrage; 3 sluices gates, the pump station and one fish pass: A. Locks Each lock is 40 meter long, one have an entrance of 8 meters wide and the other 10.50 meters wide. B. Sluices There are 3 sluice gates that control the level of water in the Magok Waterfront. Each sluice is 9 meter wide. The sluice operation helps protect Magok Waterfront from flooding. When Han River is higher than Magok reservoir, the sluices close to prevent Water River entering the fresh water of Magok reservoir. When the Han River is lower than the Magok reservoir the sluice gates open to maintain a preferred level of water in the reservoir. C. Pump station The pump station has been relocated on the Barrage. Nearby 400.000 liters of water per second can flow through each sluice gate. D. Fish pass It allows aquatic fauna to flow in/out the Magok Waterfront.


3.3. Parking Over the subterranean expressway, there are 2 parking zones (3 stories each). It allows adequate inner communication along the barrage embankment.


3.4. Olympic expressway The expressway is a subterranean infrastructure. It contains 3 lanes for private cars and one lane for public transport in each sense.


ZONE B: MAGOK RESERVOIR AND ECO-FORMATIONS


Zone B consists mainly of new waterways and wetlands established in the north basin: Magok Reservoir. The Reservoir can store about 200,000M3 of water. There are yacht marinas allocated along jetty settlements and well connected to Zone C, the Lake Park.


There is a main waterway, which connect the south side (Metro stations’ junction) with the Barrage and allows passenger boats. Three water bus stops have been purposed: two in the south side (Zone C) and one located at the end of the Barrage (Zone A).


The Magok reservoir has incorporated ‘eco-formations’, wetlands which perform as water purifying buffers between the dry land and the waterway and basin. These eco-formations are shallow. They filter and clean up all the surface water (inclusive domestic and precipitation).


The main waterway connects the Han River with the basin north and south. They consider the following environmental points: A. The waterway allows waterbus and large-size vessels to navigate along the lake parks allowing an intermediate zone –wetlands- as ecological and recreational formations along the inner shore, which change according to higher or lower water levels resulting from flooding or dry seasons. B. Magok reservoir is a leisure area, fully accessible by Seoul citizens and marina users. The vegetation of the outer zone of the waterside areas does not interfere with the flow of the water into the Reservoir in the event of flooding. The Magok reservoir establishes a mutual relationship between the wet programme along the shore, marina and the dock in terms of specific urban needs; vistas and scenery; and seasonal recreational activities. Its waterfront considers pedestrian and bicycle traffic in Zones B and C.


ZONE C: LAKE PARK


The Zone C consists of the Lake Park, Inner floodgate and the Development Stripes:


A. Lake Park


It is located within Zone C and acts as the core of the Waterfront. The Reservoir can store about 130,000M3 of water. The introduction of yacht marina has been suggested in Zone C. The Lake Park is an open air leisure space. It accommodates various activities such as waterside games, cultural activities, aquatic sports and recreational pitches, relaxation and walking of the residents, employees, and visitors of Magok. The Lake Park contains the wet programme of South Magok Waterfront (see diagram below). It has also incorporated ‘eco-formations’, wetlands, which perform as water purifying buffers between the dry land and the waterway and basin. These eco-formations are shallow. They are set up at the entrance of each creek and they filter and clean up all the surface water (inclusive domestic and precipitation). In addition, it has taken careful consideration to the subterranean conditions of the lake such as subway structure (Incheon International Airport Railroad and Subway Line 9) and sewage line (width: 45.00m). The depth of the basin is restricted according to the height of the upper slab of the structure. The main waterway for passenger boats and vessels connects the south side (Metro stations’ junction) with the inner floodgate and then the Barrage. Three water bus stops have been purposed: two in the Lake Park (Zone C) and one located at the end of the Barrage (Zone A). The design takes into account the allocation of 2 docks for passenger boats in the deeper parts of the waterway, away from the Subway Line 9’s tunnel. The South basin connects the Lake Park with the Magok reservoir. They consider the following environmental points: A. The waterway allows waterbus and large-size vessels to navigate along the lake parks allowing an intermediate zone –wetlands- as ecological and recreational formations along the inner shore, which change according to higher or lower water levels resulting from flooding or dry seasons. B. The Lake Park is also a leisure area, fully accessible by Seoul citizens and marina users. The vegetation of the outer zone of the waterside areas does not interfere with the flow of the water into the Lake Park in the event of flooding.


The east side of the Lake Park nearby the Zone E has been treated has a wetland formation. The infrastructure of Zone E: waste incinerator, Gayang Substation and heat fusion generators remain subterranean or semi-sunken and cover by green fields. The former Yangcheon Water Supply Association Drain Pump Station is a listed building located between the lake park and the infrastructure zone, and has been rehabilitated.


The lake Park establishes a mutual relationship between the wet programme along the shore, marina and the dock in terms of specific urban needs; vistas and scenery; and seasonal recreational activities. Its waterfront considers pedestrian and bicycle traffic in Zones B and C.


The ‘wet programme’ encourages utilization of various outdoor activities, through the inclusion of a recreational area by the waterside of the lake park. It reinforces the main activities of the Development Stripe: the convention center and the retail area. Temporary and seasonal minor activities relating to the recreational use such as marina club, cafes, and booths are introduced along the waterside.


B. Inner floodgate: Lake Park and Magok reservoir


1. Yangcheon-gil road - bascule bridge The main road is a surface transport road consisting of 3 lanes each sense. One bascule bridge, one for each lock, allows traffic across the road when the lock is closed. It weights approximately 80 tonnes and also uses a counterweight to save energy during operations.


2. Locks - sluices - fish pass The floodgate consists of 2 locks on the Barrage; sluices gates, the pump station and fish pass: A. Lock The lock is 40 meter long, 10.50 meters wide. B. Sluices There are 2 sluice gates that control the level of water in the Lake Park. Each sluice is 9 meter wide. They control the water pass from south basin to Magok reservoir (approx. +1.00 meter difference). In addition, the sluice operation helps protect Magok Waterfront from flooding. C. Fish pass It allows aquatic fauna to flow in/out within the Magok Waterfront.


3. Sluice ramp - gate and pump station Sluice Ramp and Gate. The boat gate’s contention walls and sluice-fish pass ramp is made with reinforced concrete. The pump station has been relocated on the Inner Barrage. Nearby 400.000 liters of water per second can flow through each sluice gate.


C. Development Stripes


The Development Stripes contains the dry programme are the supporting role of the Lake Park. They are mid-rise and mid-dense band of retail, recreation and culture. Taking strategic moves from the proposed Exhibition Facilities Complex to the edge of the infrastructure facilities of zone E, a series of development stripes are allocated. Without prescriptive intervention, we would formulate a design guide where mid-rise development with emphasis on retail and leisure activities sits adjacent to large transport hubs.


The programme consists mainly of: Convention Center to promote the R&D complexes within Magok; hotels; corporate office development; restaurants; shopping mall; small business and retails. They are linked to the exhibition facilities complex of Magok.


The development stripes are also 'local gateways', which allow permeability into the site with continuity of green walkways, which directly link the lake park and the inner city area. The importance of these stripes is they assist in creating local users and tourist for activating the landscape and waterscapes.


ZONE D (PROPOSED IDEA ZONE)


A. Seonam Sewage Treatment Plant Area


Zone D is a part of the existing Seonam Sewage Treatment Plant area. The redevelopment plan of Seonam Sewage Treatment Plant will shrink the complex to half of its size, creating an area open to development. The aim is to continue the Development Stripes of Zone C towards the Expressway.


The Development Stripes contains the dry programme (see diagram above) are the supporting role of the Magok reservoir. They are mid-rise and mid-dense band of recreation and culture. Without prescriptive intervention, we would formulate a design guide where mid-rise development with emphasis mostly on leisure activities sits adjacent to transport hubs.


The programme consists mainly of: Exhibition hall; museum; corporate office development; restaurants and retails; and an aquarium. They are also linked to the exhibition facilities complex of Magok. The water tanks are reconverted into containers for aquatic fauna and diving training.


The development stripes are 'industrial gateways', which allow permeability into the site with continuity of green walkways, which directly link the lake park and the inner city area. The importance of these programmatic stripes is they assist in creating local users and tourist for activating the manufacturing landscape and waterscapes.


ZONE E (PROPOSED IDEA ZONE)


Zone E is the site where infrastructure facilities (waste incinerator, Gayang Substation and heat fusion generators, etc.) will be located. Participants should propose a plan that considers scenic harmony and mutual connection of the lake park of Zone C and the infrastructure facilities of Zone E. The Gayang Substation is to remain in its current location.


The old drain pump station as gallery of industrial archaeology


The old drain pump station is highly valued as a modern industrial historical asset. Since the old drain pump station is not currently used for any drainage functions, the project suggests rehabilitating the building frame. The new programme will be a gallery of industrial archaeology with conference rooms and cafeteria.


IX. BUDGET


In terms of investment, Magok Waterfront project redistribute 2/3 of the initial budget in the Zones A, B & C and 1/3 in the Zones D & E.

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