Product Spec Sheet

ElementBrand
SanitarywareVOLA
SIPS panelsKingspan Insulated Panels
SanitarywareDuravit
SanitarywareGeberit
Roof manufacturersBracknell Roofing
SanitarywareC.P. Hart

Product Spec Sheet
Sanitaryware
by VOLA
SIPS panels
Sanitaryware
by Duravit
Sanitaryware
by Geberit
Roof manufacturers
Sanitaryware

142 South Street

Sandy Rendel Architects Ltd as Architects

Sandy Rendel Architects has completed 142 South Street, a new house within the scenic South Downs National Park on the banks of the River Ouse in Lewes, East Sussex.


Replacing a derelict workshop on a brownfield site that historically functioned as a wharf for the old quarry and cement works behind, the house occupies a prominent position at the entrance to the town. The local planning authority aspired for a ’landmark’ building to mark the entrance to the town and stipulated a bold design. As the first building you see, it is highly visible from the approach on the A26, as well as across the river and from above on Cliffe Hill.


Sitting on a long and narrow strip of the riverbank overlooking the Railway Land Nature Reserve, the Corten steel clad house is set against the dramatic backdrop of white cliffs. Built off the roughcast concrete river wall, the five-bedroom home enjoys expansive views to the south and west over the river and low-lying flood plain. The chalk face of Cliffe Hill rises steeply to the east providing an imposing backdrop.


The main body of the house features a simple two-storey asymmetrical pitched roof structure whose ridge is carved away to break down its scale and reflect the contours of the cliff face behind. The simple plan arrangement has been subtly distorted at each end to draw in key views and also to provide a covered terrace at the southern end and a sheltered courtyard at the entrance, buffering the sound of the adjacent road.


Emphasising the building’s form, a simple palette of self-finished materials has been carefully selected to be robust and weather naturally, developing a character that reflects the qualities of the site and surrounding area. On the ground floor on the riverside the exposed frame is constructed of board-marked concrete echoing the tone and texture of the rugged in-situ concrete river wall below. In contrast, the street elevation features walls of handmade ash-glazed Sussex brickwork traditional to the town, which gives a softer texture and more intimate scale to the street.


The roof and external first floor walls are wrapped in a continuous skin of Corten steel expanded mesh that articulates the form of the upper volume. The homogenous appearance of the surface conceals gutters, eaves and other traditional architectural elements resulting in clean, crisp detailing. Contrasting with the muted tones of the masonry base below, the decorative Corten rainscreen weathers naturally to a striking red ochre colour with a subtle variety of tone and texture. The mesh echoes the colour of the local soft red clay brickwork and tiles, whilst still remaining distinct, alluding to the industrial heritage of the area.


The 257m2 house is entered through a small courtyard followed by an enclosed and dramatic hallway lined with blackened sawn oak boards. From here the interior opens out as you move further into the house, and walls of floor-to-ceiling frameless glass windows reveal expansive views of the river and nature reserve beyond. Developed in close collaboration with Jeremy Pitts Design, the oak wall lining and joinery continue into the open plan living space. Exploiting different treatments further emphasises the material qualities and allows for the development of patina with use over time. Complementing the oak interior, mid-grey terrazzo tiling flows throughout the ground floor and connects through the glazing to the skirt of external paving around the building.


The layout is flexible to accommodate changes as the young family grows up. The three interlinked central first floor rooms will allow different configurations over time, without physical changes to the building being required.


142 South Street is a sustainable, contemporary family home that maximises dramatic and extensive views up the river towards the centre of the town and out over the river floodplain. The distinct form and profile of the house makes a positive contribution to its surroundings and adds to the rich architectural heritage of the town.


Grand Designs project Lewes East Sussex

Bracknell Roofing as Roof manufacturers

This contemporary home owes its concept to the use of self-weathering mesh as the external building and roofing cladding material.


This contemporary home owes its concept to the use of self-weathering mesh as the external building and roofing cladding material. Both the external roof and first floor are wrapped in a skin of Corten steel expanded mesh that sits on a watertight roofing membrane developed by Bracknell Roofing.


The homogenous appearance of the surface conceals gutters, eaves and other traditional architectural elements resulting in clean, crisp detailing. Contrasting with the muted tones of the masonry base below, the decorative Corten rainscreen weathers naturally to a striking red ochre colour with a subtle variety of tone and texture. The mesh echoes the colour of the local soft red clay brickwork and tiles, whilst still remaining distinct, alluding to the industrial heritage of the area. The cladding requires no further maintenance, but instead is allowed to age and change colour as the steel weathers at its own pace. 


The property was designed with two low level flat roofs and a two storey main roof expanse which included a 45 degree pitch. The robust solution provided by Bracknell Roofing’s team of highly-trained specialists included deck plywood, a polythene vapour barrier, mechanically fixed 120 mm insulation board and the specification of a fixing system across the entire roof space. This involved the use of lightweight solar rails which would act as the fixing base profiles for the steel cladding finish.


More from the Manufacturer:


Channel 4’s Grand Designs showcases year-long build of contemporary property • Bracknell Roofing provides roofing membrane solution to underpin ambitious architectural vision


Roofing specialist, Bracknell Roofing has played a crucial part in the development and construction of a striking new contemporary home recently built on the outskirts of Lewes in East Sussex.


The subject of an episode of Channel 4’s Grand Designs series, the outstanding five bed detached property was designed by Sandy Rendel Architects. It has been constructed on the banks of a river on an 11m wide plot, and owes its stunning architectural concept to the use of self-weathering steel mesh as the external building and roofing cladding material.


The perforated steel mesh provides a vivid bronzed visual effect that is not only striking in appearance, but also reflects the past industrial heritage of the site which had previously housed a cement factory. The cladding requires no further maintenance, but instead is allowed to age and change colour as the steel weathers at its own pace.


Bracknell Roofing was tasked with constructing the watertight roofing membrane onto which the steel mesh cladding would sit.


Steve Morris, Bracknell Roofing’s Contracts Manager, explains: “This was an innovative and design-led project. With the eventual steel cladding the architectural visual high point of the build, our role was to ensure that the roofing membrane which sat underneath was robust and effective and provided the highest level of waterproofing required, so the project could achieve the design aspirations of all involved.”


The property was designed with two low level flat roofs and a two storey main roof expanse which included a 45 degree pitch. The robust solution provided by Bracknell Roofing’s team of highly-trained specialists included deck plywood, a polythene vapour barrier, mechanically fixed 120 mm insulation board and the specification of a fixing system across the entire roof space. This involved the use of lightweight solar rails which would act as the fixing base profiles for the steel cladding finish.


The expert team from Bracknell Roofing worked together to ensure the installation of the roof membrane was delivered on time to enable the full build to stay on track. The team also delivered the project while meeting the specific challenges of the valley gutter, which runs through the middle of the roofing expanse as part of a design intended to reflect the rooflines of neighbouring properties.


Marc Bates, Contracts Manager at Myriad Construction, comments: “Innovative construction projects, such as this new house in Lewes, offer particular challenges. In this case, it was the use of the weathered steel mesh as the building and roofing cladding material of choice. We were able to deliver such a striking build thanks to the professionalism and expertise of Bracknell Roofing who delivered a highly-effective and innovative membrane solution that supports the stunning exterior to the building.”


Bracknell Roofing is part of the Etex Group, a major European construction company, and works as both a principal contractor and sub-contractor, depending on customer needs.

142 South Street

Inglis Hall as Internal joinery

This 257 m2 house is entered through a small courtyard and followed by an enclosed dramatic hallway lined with blackened sawn oak boards. From here the interior opens out as you move further into the house, and walls of floor-to-ceiling frameless glass windows reveal expansive views of the river and nature reserve beyond.


Throughout, the design combined the textures and colours of raw sawn oak, and blackened sawn oak. The blackened oak followed an ancient recipe, using iron filings in vinegar to react with the tannins in the oak to stain the sawn surface.

Complementing the oak interior, mid-grey terrazzo tiling flows throughout the ground floor and connects through the glazing to the skirt of external paving around the building.


More from the Manufacturer:


Inglis Hall were delighted to be asked to accept the commission of the internal architecture for Steven and Anita’s extraordinary house in Lewes. Working closely with the design team, and very strong guidance from the clients, we fulfilled the brief of building the entrance hall, kitchen, cupboards and staircase in real materials and meticulous detailing. The client approached Inglis Hall as recognised specialists in bespoke architectural interiors in Sussex. Steven had absolute clarity of vision and a near obsessive eye for detail which made this project particularly rewarding for us to work on. Our in-depth conversations with Steven at each stage of the design and build process meant we could meet his requirements with absolute precision.


The design combined the textures and colours of raw sawn oak, and blackened sawn oak. The blackened oak followed an ancient recipe, using iron filings in vinegar to react with the tannins in the oak to stain the sawn surface. This process was quite a learning curve for IH, but one we enjoyed very much. The contrast of light and dark sawn oak was used to great effect, most noticeably the transition from the dark and blackened entrance hall, stepping out into the fully glazed and wonderfully light main living space with the pale oak clad walls and joinery. The durability, beauty and resilience of English oak was used throughout the project.


Our close working relationship with local supplier of sustainable timber, English Woodlands Timber, was critical in ensuring we had exactly the right selection of English Oak to achieve the desired effect. Wetook the time and care to hand select the very best timber for maximum effect with a mixture of quarter sawn and crown cut boards, to give as much visual variation as possible.This project needed to combine beauty and strength, the hallmark of all our work. For cladding, we selected timber with tight knots which is not only more interesting to look at but withstands the process of power-sawing.


We developed a strong personal rapport with Steven and Anita during the project and have been lucky enough to be invited back to their house for several delicious suppers. It is a wonderful space to spend time in. Floor to ceiling glass on three sides, with views up the Ouse towards Newhaven, and back towards the town it is a truly inspirational project. My personal favourite detail is the blackened oak handrail, which picks back up the black as a crisp line leading you up the oak staircase. It’s this attention to detail that made it such a great project for Inglis Hall, and made it such a success.


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