German Football Museum in Dortmund

German Football Museum in Dortmund

Architect
HPP Architects
Location
Dortmund, Germany
Project Year
2015
Category
Museums
Stories By
HPP Architects

Jung
HG Esch
Product Spec Sheet

ElementBrandProduct Name
ManufacturersJung
BalustradesQ-railing
ManufacturerCarl Stahl Architecture
ManufacturerKampmann
ManufacturerSopro Bauchemie GmbH

Product Spec Sheet
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Balustrades
Manufacturer
Manufacturer
Manufacturer

German Football Museum in Dortmund

HPP Architects as Architects

The German Football Museum opened in Dortmund following 3 years of construction. The façades and form of the structure reflect the dynamism and emotion of the game.


The new premises of the German Football Museum were officially opened on October 25h with a 3-day celebration. Four years after winning the Europe-wide competition to design the museum, HPP have created a new and permanent home for the 140 years of German Football history. HG Esch has now photographed the building.


Situated in a prominent location opposite Dortmund’s central station, and complementing the existing artistic and cultural context, footballing history can be experienced for the first time on 7,700 m² of GFA in a context outside of the usual realms of the sport.


The form of the elevated structure with its wedge-shaped incisions is drawn both from the urban context on Königswall and from the exhibition concept, developed and executed by scenographers TRIAD Berlin. The architectural appearance is mainly influenced by three elements: the free-floating body, the continuous public space and the podium. The latter is a key element, particularly in terms of the surroundings, and functions as a welcoming gesture. The plateau serves to even out the varying site levels, allowing access free of thresholds and steps. The façade carries the clear message that this is the place of Germany’s most well-loved sport. The football motif is represented by a perforated aluminium façade, back-lit with LEDs. The pattern of the square perforations coalesce to form an image of a traditional football. The space between the skins of the façade can be spanned with interchangeable graphics. An LED media façade completes the exterior of the experience-orientated building.


Visitors access the building via a forecourt leading to the entrance foyer, which has been designed as a free-floating space that acts as a continuation of the city. Past the ticket desk and fan shop, an escalator takes one up into the twin levels that house the permanent exhibition. The “Arena” on the lower ground floor is reserved for temporary exhibitions and events and catering facilities.


“Dynamism and emotion, that is what football stands for and it is what our design for the German Football Museum stands for”, explains HPP’s Partner-in-Charge and Managing Director, Gerhard G. Feldmeyer. “Football inspires and connects us. It is for exactly this reason that the Football Museum building is open and inviting!”


Experience football history

Jung as Manufacturers

Located in a central, inner-city location, opposite central station, the German Football Museum presents itself as an elevated, semi-transparent box that appears to extend the station forecourt into the middle of the building. Reflecting the nation’s most loved sport, the perforated metal facade with hexagonal sections reflects the football.


Fitted out with electrical installations from JUNG, in classical LS 990 design in black, the pattern of the square perforations coalesce to form an image of a traditional football. The space between the skins of the facade can be spanned with interchangeable graphics. An LED media facade completes the exterior of this experience oriented building.


At night, banner graphics come into their own, capturing the phenomenon of public viewing and drawing the public into the fascination of football.


More from the Manufacturer:


The museum, designed by HPP architects, presents the history of German football under the “We are football” maxim. With sophisticated design and innovative exhibition strategy, one sport, one myth – that inspires all ages with the same enthusiasm – takes on a form that conveys the entire dramatic development of a football match.


The German Football Museum is in a central, inner-city location, opposite the central station, lengthening the Dortmund art and culture mile. It presents itself as an elevated, semi-transparent box that appears to extend the station forecourt into the middle of the building. While this inviting gesture effectively draws people in from the surrounding urban area, the sculptural form of the building conveys the emotions and spirit of football to the outside world. The perforated metal façade with its hexagonal sections reflects the pattern of a football. The undisputed best feature of its outward appearance however, especially in the dark, is when the banner graphics come into their own, capturing the phenomenon of public viewing and getting the public involved in the fascination of football. The German Football Museum is fitted out with electrical installations from JUNG, in the classical LS 990 design in black.


The interior space surprises the visitor with a whole world of multi-media exhibition flair incorporating more than 1,600 exhibits arranged on two levels. The open ground floor runs into the Arena area in the basement. There are rooms here that accommodate temporary exhibitions, events and the food and drink area. The heart of the museum is the permanent exhibition. Visitors reach it through an escalator that leads into the upper part of the building. Divided into three sections, the exhibition follows the dramatic sequence of a football match in the kick-off, the first half, the half-time break, the second half and after the game. Visitors experience everything about the world of football here through multimedia and other innovative forms of display. The final climax of the exhibition is the Hall of Fame, where visitors can get a little closer to their idols, and the Treasure Chamber, where the trophies from the history of German football are shown. Sports successes and shared emotions – all brought together in a museum of superlatives. The Germans’ favourite sport, compressed into an area of 2,400 square metres, is truly something to celebrate.

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