Passive family home

Passive family home

Architect
NU Architectuuratelier
Location
Gent, Belgium
Project Year
2011
Category
Private Houses
Stories By
FAKRO

NU Architectuuratelier
Bart Gosselin photograpy

New family, Passive House

FAKRO as Windows

Characteristically compact, this passive family home in Belgium gently blends into the landscape. Following the standards of passive construction, the north facade is closed in contrast to glaze south and west facades. Finished with a dark colour, a metal structure detached from the building skin prevents heat loss. Thermal insulation is provided by multi-layer panels typically used in industrial buildings. The indoor climate and ventilation are completely controlled, with almost no other source of heat except for energy stored in materials and redelivered slowly at night.


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Building name: New family, Passive House Place: Belgia, St PietersLeeuw Used FAKRO products: FTT U6


A family passive house situated in Sint-Pieters-Leeuw, Belgium, features a compact design characteristic for this type of the construction. Thanks to applying finish in a dark colour and detaching metal structure from the skin it prevents heat loss acting as a catalyst of heat. Thermal insulation function is ensured by multi-layer panels commonly used in industrial buildings. Indoor climate and ventilation are under full control, while in addition to energy accumulated in materials (which is gradually released at night) there is no other source of heat.


Despite its modern form, the building gently blends into the landscape. Following standards of passive construction, the North facade is closed in contrast to the South and West glazed facades. Aim of the glazing is to protect the building against excessive heat gain and intense sunlight. The underground garage is located directly under the building. This solution, which is unusual for singly-family construction saves space on the plot. In accordance with prevailing trends, the interior is dominated by minimalism and white colour, while rooms are high, bright and spacious.

Passive house standard

NU Architectuuratelier as Architects

Quietly anchored in the landscape, the external expression of this passive house villa seems to clearly define a distinction between night and day volume. However, inside, a scenography unfolds and the different functions can be found on different levels with interesting inter-relations. Without falling into the syndrome of a Tupperware energy home with superfluous technological novelties, this house demonstrates that spatial and visual relationships can be realized by going into direct dialogue with the surrounding context.


More from the Architect:


This project concerns a new family house designed according to the passive house standard. It's a compact home that acts as a catalyst of heat. To do this, the exterior finish has a dark tint, and the metal structure is completely detached from the skin to prevent heat loss. Sandwich panels, normally used in industrial buildings (fridges), are used as insulation . Despite its considerable thickness (25 cm) and the numerous preparatory details it induces, implementation will be quick and easy.


Indoor climate and ventilation are completely controlled, with almost no other source of heat except for the energy stored in materials and redelivered slowly at night. The North facade is relatively closed, this in contrast to the South and West high glazed glazing which unfolds at the corner of the building. Where the sun is stronger, a setback of the glazing protects against glare and overheating. Implementing the detached metal structure, the parking basement in concrete and the skin in sandwich panel also allows easy future upgrading. External expression of this villa seems to clearly define a distinction between night and day-volume. However, inside, a scenography unfolds and the different functions can be found on different levels with interesting inter-relations. Without falling into the syndrome of a Tupperware energy home with superfluous technological novelties, this house demonstrates that spatial and visual relationships can be realized by going into direct dialogue with the surrounding context. A barn quietly anchored in the landscape.


Year: 2014

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