Temple de l’Amour II

Temple de l’Amour II

Architect
Kraaijvanger
Location
Bourgogne , France
Project Year
2001
Category
Memorials
© Christian Richters

Temple de l’Amour II

Kraaijvanger as Architects

1-Dec-2017 The project was conceived after the accidental discovery of a vault in the abutment of a former railway bridge. 2.5 m. of limestone were crushed to reveal this beautiful space, formerly concealed. On the bridge a pavilion was made for contemplation, as a counterpoint to the existing, 18th century folly called the Temple de l’Amour. Any interference of construction has been avoided: glass itself carries the roof, creating a full panorama, while enhancing the beauty of the existing stonework. The visual mass of the roof gives a sense of continuous, extended space.


The aim of the design is to express the magic of the roof floating on nothing. The detailing is coherent, non-conspicuous, minimal. As if the glass is cut through the ancient stone.


On a triangular site an eighteenth-century folly called ‘le temple de l’amour’ has been turned into a small summer residence for the client. At the other end the area is bordered by the abutment of a demolished railway bridge. This construction has a classical, almost Ledoux-like expression, due to the use of large blocks of local limestone. The project of the Temple de l’Amour II was conceived after the accidental discovery of a vault in the abutment, made as an explosion chamber to destroy the bridge in times of war. Over 2.5 m of limestone were crushed to create an access from the riverside, in order to reveal this beautiful, yet concealed space.


On the former bridge we imagined a pavilion for contemplation, to enjoy the river and the burgundy landscape. The idea was to avoid the interference of construction and to extend the natural space of the track and the bridge. Glass itself would carry the roof, creating a full 360-degree panorama, while enhancing the beauty of the existing stonework.


The cantilevered roof – essential for the shelter – consists of a timber stressed skin construction, weighing about 2000 kg. Two glass panels on either side carry its load (10.10.2 laminated float glass). Lateral stability and the anchoring to the ground are provided by 2 x 2 full height laminated, toughened glass panels (10.10.2) while four small side-panels contribute to the rotation stability. Four toughened glass doors give access to the pavilion and allow for ventilation. A laminated glass hatch covers the man-hole to the cave. A glass bench on the terrace reflects the light, as in a pond. This glass is slightly tinted (8.8.8.2.2, with a green tinted middle sheet). Its support (2 x IPE400) represents the former track.


The aim of the design is to express the magic of a roof ‘floating on nothing’. The detailing is coherent, non-conspicuous, minimal. As if the glass cuts through the ancient stone.


18-May-2010 On a triangular site an eighteenth-century folly called ‘le temple de l’amour’ has been turned into a small summer residence for the client. The project of the Temple de l’Amour II was conceived after the accidental discovery of a vault in the abutment, made as an explosion chamber to destroy the bridge in times of war.


On the former bridge we imagined a pavilion for contemplation, to enjoy the river and the burgundy landscape. The idea was to avoid the interference of construction and to extend the natural space of the track and the bridge. Glass itself would carry the roof, creating a full 360-degree panorama, while enhancing the beauty of the existing stonework.


The aim of the design is to express the magic of a roof ‘floating on nothing’. The detailing is coherent, non-conspicuous, minimal. As if the glass cuts through the ancient stone.

Project Credits
ABT
Engineers
Contractors
Engineers
Product Spec Sheet

ElementBrand
glass manufacturerScheuten Glass
Product Spec Sheet
glass manufacturer
Boon Rawd Brewery Headquarters
next project

Boon Rawd Brewery Headquarters

Offices
Bangkok, Thailand - Build completed in 2020
View Project