Port House

Port House

Car Parks and Marinas
Eiermarkt 5, 2000 Antwerpen, Belgium - Planned in 2016
Architect Zaha Hadid’s breathtaking Port House with CUPA PIZARRAS slate.

story by Cupa Pizarras

Architect Zaha Hadid’s breathtaking Port House with CUPA PIZARRAS slate.
Architect Zaha Hadid’s breathtaking Port House with CUPA PIZARRAS slate.
Cupa Pizarras as Manufacturers
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A Lighthouse For The World

story by SCHÜCO

A Lighthouse For The World
A Lighthouse For The World
SCHÜCO as Manufacturers
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Hufton + Crow

Port House

Zaha Hadid Architects as Architects

The new Port House in Antwerp repurposes, renovates and extends a derelict fire station into a new headquarters for the port. Continued like the bow of a ship, the new extension points towards the Scheldt and connects the building with the river. ZHA developed a sustainable and energy-efficient design for this structure; a contemporary building in shining glass with its dynamic, ambitious and innovative design, standing as a symbol for the port. The new extension's façade is a glazed surface that ripples like waves and reflects the changing tones and colors of the city’s sky, while the triangular facets allow the apparently smooth curves at either end of the building to be formed with flat sheets of glass.


More from the architect:


The new Port House in Antwerp repurposes, renovates and extends a derelict fire station into a new headquarters for the port – bringing together the port’s 500 staff that previously worked in separate buildings around the city.


With 12 km of docks, Antwerp is Europe’s second largest shipping port, serving 15,000 sea trade ships and 60,000 inland barges each year.


Antwerp handles 26% of Europe’s container shipping, transporting more than 200 million tonnes of goods via the ocean-going vessels that call at the port and providing direct employment for over 60,000 people, including more than 8,000 port workers.


Indirectly, the Port of Antwerp ensures about 150,000 jobs and has ambitious targets for future expansion to meet the continent’s growth and development over the next century.


In 2007, when the former 1990s offices of the Port of Antwerp had become too small, the port determined that relocation would enable its technical and administrative services to be housed together, providing new accommodation for about 500 staff. The port required a sustainable and future-proof workplace for its employees, representing its ethos and values in an ever-expanding local and international arena.


As the threshold between the city and its vast port, Mexico Island in Antwerp’s Kattendijk dock on Quay 63 was selected as the site for the new head office. The waterside site also offered significant sustainable construction benefits, allowing materials and building components to be transported by water, an important requirement to meet the port’s ecological targets.


Following the construction of a new fire station with facilities needed to service the expanding port, the old fire station on the Mexico Island site – a listed replica of a Hanseatic residence – became redundant and relied on a change of use to ensure its preservation. This disused fire station had to be integrated into the new project. The Flemish government's department of architecture, together with the City and Port authorities organized the architectural competition for the new headquarters.


Zaha Hadid Architects' design is informed by detailed historical research and a thorough analysis of both the site and the existing building.


Marc Van Peel, president of the Port of Antwerp, said: “There was only one rule laid down in the architectural competition, namely that the original building had to be preserved. There were no other requirements imposed for the positioning of the new building. The jury was therefore pleasantly surprised when the five shortlisted candidates all opted for a modern structure above the original building. They all combined the new with the old, but the design by Zaha Hadid Architects was the most brilliant.”


Working with Origin, leading heritage consultants in the restoration and renovation of historic monuments, ZHA’s studies of the site’s history and heritage are the foundations of the design which firstly emphasises the north-south site axis parallel with the Kattendijkdok linking the city centre to the port. Secondly, due to its location surrounded by water, the building's four elevations are considered of equal importance with no principal facade. ZHA’s design is an elevated extension, rather than a neighbouring volume which would have concealed at least one of the existing facades.


ZHA and Origin’s historic analysis of the old fire station also highlighted the role of its originally intended tower - a grand, imposing component of the fire station's Hanseatic design. Its bold vertical statement, intended to crown the imposing volume of the building below, was never realised.


These three key principles define the design’s composition of new and old: a new volume that ‘floats’ above the old building, respecting each of the old facades and completing the verticality of the original design’s unrealised tower.


Continued Like the bow of a ship, the new extension points towards the Scheldt, connecting the building with the river on which Antwerp was founded.


Surrounded by water, the new extension's façade is a glazed surface that ripples like waves and reflects the changing tones and colours of the city’s sky. Triangular facets allow the apparently smooth curves at either end of the building to be formed with flat sheets of glass. They also facilitate the gradual transition from a flat façade at the south end of the building to a rippling surface at the north.


While most of the triangular facets are transparent, some are opaque. This calibrated mix ensures sufficient sunlight within the building, while also controlling solar load to guarantee optimal working conditions. At the same time, the alternation of transparent and opaque facade panels breaks down the volume of the new extension, giving panoramic views of the Scheldt, the city and the Port as well as providing enclosure.


The façade’s rippling quality is generated with flat facets to the south that gradually become more three-dimensional towards to the north. This perception of a transparent volume, cut to give the new building its sparkling appearance, reinterprets Antwerp’s moniker as the city of diamonds. The new extension appears as a carefully cut form which changes its appearance with the shifting intensity of daylight. Like the ripples on the surface of the water in the surrounding port, the new façade reflects changing light conditions.


The old fire station’s central courtyard has been enclosed with a glass roof and is transformed into the main reception area for the new Port House. From this central atrium, visitors access the historic public reading room and library within the disused fire truck hall which has been carefully restored and preserved. Panoramic lifts provide direct access to the new extension with an external bridge between the existing building and new extension giving panoramic views of the city and port.


The client requirements for an ‘activity based office’ are integrated within the design, with related areas such as the restaurant, meeting rooms and auditorium located at the centre of the upper levels of the existing building and the bottom floors of the new extension. The remaining floors more remote from the centre, comprise open plan offices.


Collaborating with services consultant Ingenium, ZHA developed a sustainable and energy-efficient design reaching a ‘Very Good’ BREEAM environmental rating. Despite the challenges of integrating with a protected historic building, high standards in sustainable design were achieved by implementing effective strategies at each stage of construction. A borehole energy system pumps water to a depth of 80m below grade in over 100 locations around the building to provide heating and cooling. In the existing building, this system uses chilled beams. In the new extension, it uses chilled ceilings.


Waterless lavatory fittings and motion detectors minimise water consumption while building automation and optimal daylight controls minimise artificial lighting.


With constant references to the Scheldt, the city of Antwerp and the dynamics of its port, married with the successful renovation and reuse of a redundant fire station integrating it as a fully-fledged part of its headquarters - the new Port House will serve the port well through its planned expansion over future generations.


Marc Van Peel said: “The architectural style of the original building, a replica of the former Hansa House, recalls the 16th century, Antwerp's "golden century." But now above this original, a contemporary structure in shining glass has been built, which I am sure, represents a new golden century for Antwerp.”


17-Oct-2011


Top architect Zaha Hadid launches construction of new Port House


Antwerp, 10 September 2012 - The leading British architect Zaha Hadid gave the official order to begin construction work on Port House, the new headquarters for Antwerp Port Authority on the Kattendijk dock. The order was given in the presence of the Flemish ministers Hilde Crevits and Geert Bourgeois, port alderman Marc Van Peel and Port Authority CEO Eddy Bruyninckx. Once the new headquarters is handed over in 2015 the Port Authority will overcome the urgent shortage of space in its present headquarters. But beyond that the new Port House will stand as a symbolic gateway to the port area. The actual construction work will start on 1 October 2012 and will take 33 calendar months.


The design


The new Port House is a two-part design, consisting of a dynamic beam-shaped structure raised above the former fire station, a listed building which is being restored and given a dramatic new role. The two components make the Port House a volumetric composition that offers breathtaking views across the city and its port. The superstructure façade is made up of glass triangles, each slightly rotated with respect to each other, producing a constantly changing play of reflected light. The unusual design also poses a challenge for the contractors who will do the actual building work. For example, the subcontractor responsible for the 1500-tonne steel structure, Victor Buyck Steel Construction, has opted to build it in a modual way in six large parts. These will be constructed in workshops in Wondelgem and carried to Antwerp by barge. Facilities


The new building will provide a workplace for some 500 Port Authority employees. Some of the landscape offices and meeting rooms will be housed in the existing building, the former fire station. These areas will be accessed from the central atrium. There are also open-plan offices and meeting rooms within the new volume, but in addition there will be an auditorium and a company restaurant with a panoramic view. Staff and visitors will access this part by panoramic lifts. Flemish minister Geert Bourgeois, responsible for Real Estate Heritage, is full of admiration for the efforts made by the Port Authority to preserve and repurpose the 90-year-old fire station, giving it a new future while continuing to serve the public and the port. “The project largely respects the material integrity of this historic building,” he declared. The minister has granted a subsidy of 2.1 million euros for restoration of the fire station.


Investment plan


Altogether the new Port House will cost 49.9 million euros. This investment forms part of the wide-ranging investment programme of 1.6 billion euros approved by the Port Authority board of directors in 2010. The financial effort represented by this plan will ensure that Antwerp can further reinforce its position as the second-largest port in Europe, and that Port Authority employees will have the necessary resources to provide high-level service for customers of the port. For example, in the near future the tug fleet will acquire a series of new tugs, while the dredger fleet will acquire new hopper dredging barges. “These investments are less visible to the outside world than the architecture of our new headquarters, but they are just as essential for our operations,” explained port alderman Marc Van Peel. Connection between city and port


“With the new Port House we have given a face to the world-class port that Antwerp undoubtedly is. With its dynamic, ambitious and innovative design it stands as a symbol for our port,” Van Peel continued. “From the new buildiong visitors will have a truly impressive view over the city as well as the port, so further strengthening the dialogue between the people of Anwerp and their port.” Flemish minister of Transport & Public Works Hilde Crevits added: “The new Port House designed by Zaha Hadid will be a proud landmark for Antwerp. The striking design will give Antwerp a wonderful architectural jewel that matches its position and importance as a world port. Along with the MAS museum and the new Port House, the new Antwerp Coordination Center will further consolidate this position. In functional terms the new coordination centre will bring together all the actors in the chain of shipping traffic management physically together on a single platform, while the building itself designed by the architectural firm of Neutelings-Riedijk will also be distinctive. Together, these three landmarks will bind the city and the port close together.”

Architect Zaha Hadid’s breathtaking Port House with CUPA PIZARRAS slate.

Cupa Pizarras as Manufacturers

The Havenhuis or Port House building dominates the port of Antwerp (Belgium), a truly stunning building by architect Zaha Hadid. Yet another reason to visit the second largest seaport in Europe, which handles over 14.000 trade ships per year.

 

The initial building was a heritage listed fire station, but in dire need of a complete renovation. For this reason, the Flemish government's department of architecture, together with the City and Port authorities established an architectural competition for the new headquarters. There was only one rule: preserving the building’s traditional name, Havenhuis.

 

Zaha Hadid, Anglo-Iraqi architect and the first woman to receive the Pritzker Architecture Prize, in 2004, designed a project that preserved the original building and made it part of something much bigger.

 

The architectural style of the original building recalls the 16th century, Antwerp's golden century. The gigantic extension is elevated above its natural slate roof, ensuring none of the original facades are concealed. Zaha Hadid Architects chose CUPA 4 EXCELLENCE natural slate for its proven record in Belgium, both for historical building renovation and new projects.

 

The new 4 levelled structure is 105 m long and weighs 1500 tons. From the distance, it looks like a large glass ship carried by two immense pillars of white concrete. The structure is now affectionally known as “the diamond ship” for the triangular shape of its 2.000 glass panels and the history of Antwerp as hub of the diamond trade. The whole building has a total floorplan of 12,800 square metres – 6,600 square metres in the refurbished fire station and a further 6,200 square metres in the extension.

 

Zaha Hadid’s Havenhuis is the perfect representation of the evolution of Antwerp from pioneers of world trade to one of the biggest modern seaports in the world. After her death in 2016, months before the project was completed, the city council decided to change the nearby public square to Zaha Hadid Square as a tribute to her contribution to the city. 

A Lighthouse For The World

SCHÜCO as Manufacturers

A special construction consisting of triangular segments with variable angles at the intersections was developed by Schüco. It enables the formation of apparently smooth curves with flat glass plates and creates a gradual transition from flat façade on the south end to a wave-like façade in the north.

The mixing of transparent and opaque façade units interrupts the building volume, the seemingly transparent surface of which changes with the varying intensity of daylight. Acoustic tests as well as air and water tightness tests were also performed by Schüco.


More from the manufacturer:


The vertical extension, renovation and transformation of a former fire station into the new headquarters for the Antwerp port authorities combines the old with the new and is a symbol for the future of maritime trade that is visible for miles around.


The need for a new office building for the Antwerp port authorities and the wish to keep the listed Hanseatic-style building of a former fire station on the docks led to an invitation to take part in a competition with the brief of keeping the old building and transforming it. The design by ZahaHadid Architects for an elevated extension to the existing building is a nod to a tower that was originally intended for the Hanseatic building and was to be added as a landmark that could be seen for miles around. What did not come about at the time is now being realised in the extension. Its signal-like effect is a reference to Antwerp as the "city of diamonds" and its shape resembling the hull of a ship symbolises the maritime trade in the port of Antwerp. The new building appears to float above the old one, and the austere, angular solidity of the existing building with its four equal façades contrasts with the dynamic curved surface of the new building, which represents the principle of a single, flowing façade like an organic object.


Developed by Schüco, architects and façade fabricators, a special construction consisting of triangular segments with variable angles at the intersections enables the formation of apparently smooth curves with flat glass plates and creates a gradual transition from flat façade on the south end of the building to a wave-like façade in the north. The mixing of transparent and opaque façade units interrupts the building volume, the seemingly transparent surface of which changes with the varying intensity of daylight. The new Port House in Antwerp is a prime example of the sensitive treatment of history and the needs of the location in equal measure. It also points confidently towards the future in terms of form, sustainability, design method and production process. A glittering lighthouse for all the world to see.


The new headquarters for the Antwerp port authorities is a result of the interaction between three spatial elements: the existing listed building, a concrete bridge and the vertical extension.


INTERVIEWS


JORIS PAUWELS: „A DYNAMIC APPEARANCE IN CONTRAST TO STATIC DIGNITY“ Executive director for the Port House project at ZahaHadid Architects


How do the three spatial elements of the new port house – the existing building, the new extension and the concrete bridge – relate to each other?


Looking at the existing building and the new building as a whole, we like to see them as two entities, where one cannot work without the other. The existing building provides the base for the entire project, it is not something we dismissed, we see it as an equal part of the constellation. Despite the very different nature of the two buildings, we have been trying to give the same qualities of space to both the existing and the new building. In order to connect the two programmatically, we applied some kind of sandwich-concept, whereby we have chosen to put all the common program such as auditorium, restaurant, foyer and meeting rooms, in the middle of the building, so they are organised on the top floors of the existing building and on the bottom floors of the new building. We proposed the concrete bridge as a third element, which had not been part of the competition brief. In order to break and shift its volume, we suggested to create a multi-purpose external environment, a viewing terrace for multiple use above the existing city fabric and with access to the restaurant. Obviously there are various views to the port and to the city from up there. Looking down through cut-outs in the bridge one can see the square in front; looking up, there are windows that expose some of the interior of the new building – it is a very three-dimensional, spatial environment.


How did your office approach the re-design of the existing pre-war building, technically and formally?


Zaha was very interested in layering, in working with the existing building. We chose to respect the existing, listed building as much as possible. Both the external and internal facades, the courtyard and the staircases were still very much intact, most of the original interior, however, had been already changed throughout its former use as a fire station. We very much followed our heritage consultant when it came to the renovation, we gave them the lead on what we could or could not do; there was a constant dialogue with heritage consultants and with heritage authorities. We restored all the facades in a very low-tech way. The brickwork for example is very much patchy and you can read historically what has happened, because we did not want to damage the fabric of the brickwork too much. The doors were kept original, where possible, where not, we made copies. For example, we automated the massive doors between the atrium and the reading room, which used to be the hall for the fire trucks, and we automated these. So the technical system is new, but the doors are kept intact as much as possible and we worked with the original framing.


The new extension seems to float on top of the existing one. Are the two volumes structurally connected at all?


Structurally, we tried not to interfere too much with the existing building, the structure of the new building is completely independent. However, there is a new element we brought in, that has an impact on the existing structure: the new roof of the previously open atrium is supported by the brick walls of the existing building. The weight of the new building is fully carried by two concrete columns, one is central in the atrium, and one is, inclined, positioned in front of the building. The concrete bridge connects the two columns on top, while there is an underground connection as well. Basically, a vertical ring out of concrete goes over and under the South wing of the existing building to support the new building. The black columns inside the atrium space provide lateral stability.


The facade of the new building is one dynamic surface. What is the underlying conceptual intention of the transition on its surface from flat to rippling, from transparent to opaque? What design technique did you apply?


We wanted the new volume to have a dynamic appearance in contrast to the static dignity of the existing building. To reinforce this dynamic in addition to its geometry, we wanted it to appear as if in motion. By triangulating the segments of the facade, we created the transition from flat to more cracked. Initially, at the competition stage, this was a kind of random pattern. Throughout the process, we were collaborating with our local architect, the facade constructor and Schüco to develop a realistic concept that would meet both aesthetic and economic expectations. We made an analysis of how many different modules we could afford, how many modules we would need to keep the random effect and not to see repetition throughout the building.


In the original design of the existing building, there was a tower included which had never been realised. What role did this tower play in your design?


When our heritage consultants came up with the original design, which had this very tall, ornamental tower, we thought this original intention would justify a vertical element on top of the existing building. The fact that the existing building does not have a main facade, but rather four equal facades, which is quite exceptional for a building from that time, is another reason why we immediately thought it would be interesting to put something on top and not build something in front, because it would block one of the facades.


ANNIK DIRKX: „VALUE OF DESIGN AS A SPECTACLE" Press officer for the port authority in Antwerp


The new Port House is very iconic. What is the message behind this gesture?


We have opted for ZahaHadid Architect’s design because of the value of design as a spectacle. We were looking for a bold landmark for the city and the port, creating an identity which combines the old with the new. For centuries, our port has been one of the leading ports in the world. We as a community want to work towards the future, be innovative and courageous in order to maintain our strong position as a global player. We want the building to be a signal which represents our willing to connect with the world and to represent our open and challenging look towards the future.


How does the new office building change the work environment for the port’s employees?


The new Port House's main objectives were the establishing of new work modes, and the integration of our technical and administrative services in one location. A number of services were established in the former fire station, other services were in the Hofstraat and in the old Port House at the Entrepotkaai. By grouping these services, the internal co-operation is far more efficient. The 500 employees of the Port Authority who work at the ZahaHadidplein will use this time flexibly. This means they will swap their fixed workplaces for mobile workplaces. Moreover, they can swap desk depending on the nature of the activity: telephone, concentrated work or meetings. We wanted a sustainable and future-proof workplace for our employees, representing the Port’s ethos and values in a local and international arena.


How has the new Port House been perceived by the public?


First designed exclusively as the office building of the Antwerp Port Authority, we realised throughout the process an increasing interest among the public. The iconic architecture by ZahaHadid Architects in combination with the specific scenery and panoramic view of the site became very attractive for visitors. So we decided to open up our building for guided tours for the public. Visitors interested in the building and the panoramic view on the Antwerp skyline or at the port can take guided group tours, where on one evening per week and on weekends experienced guides will explain the design of the new building and the history and future of the port (http://www.visitantwerpen.be/detail/the-port-house-group-en). The tours are available in Dutch, French, English and German. The Port House also offers a meeting place for the many international partners of the Antwerp port community.


The production process of the Port House has been rewarded for its sustainability. How sustainable is the building utilisation?


The new Port House is a textbook example of sustainability. Sustainably-sourced materials were used for its construction, and the building is heated or cooled throughout by a ground heat storage system that saves 270 tonnes of CO2 emissions annually. The Port Authority also facilitates sustainable travel between home and work for its personnel. In the car park there are 30 charging points, 20 for electric bicycles and 10 for electric cars, there is a City Bike station in front of the door, and the Shuttle Bus offers two direct connections free of charge for employees.


The Port House is one of the projects ZahaHadid had been involved with planning before her death. How did your organisation contribute in honouringZahaHadid?


The public square beside the Port House has been named after ZahaHadid, so the address of the Port House is now „ZahaHadiplein 1“. From the opening until the end of this year, there is an exhibition in the atrium of the new building, dedicated to her life and work as the first female winner of the world-class Pritzker Architectural Prize. The exhibition features models of ZahaHadid buildings all over the world, as well as other items designed by her such as vases and shoes. Also on show will be information about the Port House construction project. In addition, we soon will publish the book „The Antwerp Port House” (Pandora Publishers, 2016). In this book, we document the history of the port and the old fire station, document the construction process of the new building and honour the innovative and iconic design as one of ZahaHadid’s legacy.


ETIENNE CLINQUART: „LINKING DESIGN AND PRODUCTION WAS A MUST“ Directorof Groven+


Together with Schüco, ZahaHadid Architects and façade fabrication company Groven+ developed and built a unique façade system for the Port House in Antwerp. Etienne Clinquart, Director of the Belgian façade fabrication company, speaks of the particular challenges posed by developing and building the new façade system.


How would you describe the collaboration between Schüco, Groven+ and ZHA in developing the customised façade system for the Port House?


Combining our on-site experience as a façade construction company with the system-based approach from Schüco, we were able to realise the specific design by ZahaHadid Architects with a customised façade – using cutting-edge technology, whilst working and communicating very closely throughout the entire design, production and construction process in this triangular constellation with builder, manufacturer and designer of the façade. Together, our task was to develop an innovative solution within the process, as the design requirements were unprecedented. Every party contributed their own knowledge and expertise with regard to a sustainable solution.


Our engagement with ZahaHadid Architects was a performance guarantee both in terms of technical aspects of the façade as well as aesthetic aspects. For the latter, we guaranteed that the final design should respect the architectural drawings. Working on our 3D-CAD-System, all of our drawings were transmitted to the architects for approval, as the complete architectural design was a requirement developed by ZahaHadid Architects. The collaboration with ZahaHadid Architects during the planning process would look as follows. We received from them the external points of the façade in 3D, in the angles between the triangular glass elements, which were the parametric quotations from the outside. All of the profiles where defined in three dimensions, not in terms of the technical demands, but on an architectural basis. That meant that we had to develop a façade in a very narrowly defined frame, which we did with success.


Could you talk about the interfaces between designing, planning and manufacturing?


Given the complexity of the façade, working with a program like our 3D-CAD-System was a necessity; linking design and production was a must. For this reason, the 3D design was a large part of the work and became the basis for the construction planning. This work took over two years. Considering the extraordinary position of the new building above an existing one, the erection and installation was a challenge. Therefore, we produced and assembled as many components as possible in our workshops – more than 450 frames, each with at least 3 triangular glass units. The fact that all of the units were different necessitated sophisticated organisationin terms of logistics.


How did you plan and execute the assembly of the facade elements?


Once the engineering was completed, we started production. Given the fact that installation would proceed faster than production, we had planned to produce at least 50 % of the facade units before starting installation. We defined the necessary materials with our 3D-CAD-system, then we used STEP files to transmit the required information to the CNC machines. Assembly in the workshop was strictly on theoretical basis, as defined by the 3D model. It was only on site, after installation, that we could check that the construction was good.


Did you test the new facade system before production and construction?


Acoustic tests as well as air and watertightness tests were performed by Schüco. Given the specific location of the Port House in the middle of the harbour and on the River Schelde, the requirements for air and watertightness were very high. They were combined with deformation tests to simulate the working of the steel construction. These tests were conducted before production started in order to adjust the engineering work in accordance with the results. In fact, the test results were not only considered in the engineering, but also integrated into the design.


What role did BIM play in the overall process?


The challenges on this project were considerable. A complete façade system that met the architectural and technical demands needed to be developed; an overall approach to logistics had to be established for production and installation. Another major challenge was the combination with the steelwork, as we had to combine steel plans and facade plans in different installations, taking into account the different deformations and settings of the construction in view of the weight. The only way to work properly with such a complex design was by creating a complete BIM-modelled façade, defining all of the production and construction parameters. Everything was executed on the basis of this model.

Port House

Multiline Licht as Manufacturers

Multiline, the leading manufacturer of custom-made lighting solutions, was tasked with the illumination of the offices and restaurant for the building. They provided with the unique and efficient light profile; the 90mm wide profile foreseen with high-quality LED modules and DALI dimmable LED drivers from Tridonic.The unique design of the ceilings required all profiles to be of different lengths and angles, while the diffusers and blind plates were built to be perfectly in line with the ceiling plates.Various technological options were integrated into the lighting systems: from presence detection, light sensors, smoke sensors to even a sprinkler system.


More from the manufacturer:


The new Port House in Antwerp, which was designed by Zaha Hadid Architects, repurposes, renovates and extends a derelict fire station into a new headquarters for the port. The two-part design consists of a dynamic beam-shaped structure that ‘floats’ above the original building.


The superstructure’s façade is a glazed surface that ripples like waves and reflects the changing colours of the sky. Its rippling quality is generated with flat facets to the south that gradually become more three-dimensional towards to the north. While most of the triangular facets are transparent, some are opaque. This mix ensures sufficient sunlight within the building to guarantee optimal working conditions.


The goal was to create an ‘activity based office’. This resulted in areas such as the restaurant, meeting rooms and auditorium being located at the centre of the upper levels of the old building and the bottom floors of the extension. The remaining floors, which are more remote from the centre, comprise open plan offices. The new port house provides a workplace for approximately 500 port employees.


Cooperation


Sustainability was a pivotal aspect in this project. In order to achieve high standards in energy-efficient design, the client was in need of custom-made lighting solutions that fulfilled his demands and expectations perfectly. As lighting manufacturer who excels in customizing light profiles, Multiline was tasked with the illumination of the offices and restaurant in the new structure as well as the main entrance in the original building. All the products needed to fit exactly into the foreseen openings in the ceiling. To meet this requirement, extremely detailed lighting plans and calculations had to be made, which ultimately led to the creation of a unique and efficient light profile.


Realisation


New tooling materials were necessary to develop a new profile, diffuser and blind plate. The result was a 90mm wide profile foreseen with high-quality LED modules and DALI dimmable LED drivers from Tridonic. These elements guarantee a very long lifetime as well as low maintenance and energy costs for the end user, which underlines our special attention for energy-efficiency. Demands regarding glare and lux level for the general office lighting were also met without fault with the custom-made light profile.


The architectural and technological aspects were two other focus points in the development of the lighting fixtures. Due to the unique design of the ceilings, all profiles required different lengths and angles. Diffusers and blind plates were built to be perfectly in line with the ceiling plates, resulting in a beautiful streamlined view in the offices. Furthermore, the client demanded the integration of many technological options into our lighting systems: from presence detection, light sensors, smoke sensors to even a sprinkler system. Multiline was clearly able to fulfil every wish of the client and absolutely succeeded in showcasing its role as a leading manufacturer of custom-made lighting solutions.

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Acoustical ceilings
PVC-roofing
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ASSA ABLOY nvASSA ABLOY nvLocksets
BASF CONSTRUCTION SOLUTIONSBASF CONSTRUCTION SOLUTIONSResilient flooring
BegaExterior
Convents NVSupplier
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Desso AirmasterCarpets
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