Lone Mountain Ranch House

Lone Mountain Ranch House

Architect
Studio Rick Joy
Location
Golden, New Mexico, USA | View Map
Category
Private Houses
Peter Ogilvie
Product Spec Sheet

ElementBrandProduct Name
ManufacturersCATELLANI & SMITH
ManufacturersFlos
ManufacturersDornbracht
ManufacturersFSB
ManufacturersArtemide
ManufacturersDacor

Product Spec Sheet
Manufacturers
Manufacturers
by Flos
Manufacturers
Manufacturers
by FSB
Manufacturers
Manufacturers
by Dacor

Lone Mountain Ranch House

Studio Rick Joy as Architects

Secluded in the expanse of a 27,000-acre Japanese wagyu beef ranch in the high desert of central New Mexico, this six-bedroom family house is a study in opposing relationships between and among functions, walls, orientations, and corners. An indoor-outdoor “living deck” – a wood-floored central space for cooking, dining, and longing that beyond the exterior walls – separates the house’s two private zones: one containing the owner’s suite and office to the east, the other with spaces for family and guests to the west. A single long hallway provides an asymmetric spine connecting the two.

photo_credit Peter Ogilvie
Peter Ogilvie

              The interior of the central living space is bright, courtesy of the American Clay wall finish and quarter-sawn white oak flooring and kitchen cabinetry. The island is plate stainless steel, and the fireplace is board-formed concrete using the same white oak that makes up the facing kitchen wall. This space is flanked by window walls with sliding doors that unite the interior and exterior wood decks. The window wall and deck to the north frame the ranch’s namesake, Lone Mountain; the window wall and the partly covered deck to the south offer sun access and a view of the thunderstorms that often pass by. A lone horse trough and hitching post anchors the southwest corner.

photo_credit Peter Ogilvie
Peter Ogilvie

              The house’s three volumes are united by a single twisted-hip roof whose box-rib panels are made of corrugated galvanized steel. The roof contains a hidden deck for relaxing and sleeping under the stars, with a fire bowl and a telescope for the owner’s amateur stargazing. This asymmetrical hip roof is twisted dramatically and ringed by V-shaped gutters, which channel water to two deep cisterns at the opposite low corners of the house, which can be accessed in the event that one of the area’s periodic wildfires approach the house. The house’s two private volumes are clad in Japanese charred-wood shou sugi ban siding, a material known for its fire-resistant qualities. 

photo_credit Peter Ogilvie
Peter Ogilvie
photo_credit Peter Ogilvie
Peter Ogilvie
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