Emixi Architectes designs a temporary classroom pavilion in a park
Karina Castro

Emixi Architectes designs a temporary classroom pavilion in a park

1 Mar 2024  •  News  •  By Gerard McGuickin

Lausanne-based Emixi Architectes has completed the design and build of a temporary classroom pavilion in Romanel-sur-Lausanne, a municipality in Switzerland. Located in Prazqueron Park, the contemporary, single-story building has four corner classrooms, each with direct access to the outside. Generously glazed facades connect the classroom pavilion with its park setting and flood internal spaces with an abundance of natural light. The pavilion is encircled by a covered walkway that provides shade in warm summer months and a level of protection against the elements.

photo_credit Karina Castro
Karina Castro
photo_credit Karina Castro
Karina Castro
photo_credit Emixi Architectes
Emixi Architectes
photo_credit Emixi Architectes
Emixi Architectes

The classroom pavilion was commissioned by Romanel-sur-Lausanne’s municipal administration as a temporary measure while the community awaits a new school complex. “Designed in three months and built in two, the pavilion meets an urgent need in the face of demographic growth in the village,” says Emixi. The prefabricated building was constructed from wooden components that were assembled efficiently and with ease. Given its temporary nature, the construction system ensures the structure can be disassembled and reused or recycled with minimal waste. “Although the building is temporary and can be dismantled, the focus is on high-quality, comfortable pedagogical spaces,” says the studio. The classrooms are finished to a high standard — the pavilion’s overall design and build is in marked contrast to the container-style solutions often employed in this type of temporary project.

photo_credit Karina Castro
Karina Castro
photo_credit Karina Castro
Karina Castro
photo_credit Emixi Architectes
Emixi Architectes

The classrooms are symmetrically composed and run along the main axes of the building. The pavilion is uniformly constructed in wood (with woodwork by digital modeling and fabrication studio Laporch), including the use of cross-laminated timber — this material will have a positive effect on the health and well-being of both children and teachers. Wood is used throughout the interior, including as an acoustic surface on the ceilings, as wall panels, and in furniture. The wood’s natural aesthetic is complemented by the use of color: a greenish-blue floor connects each of the classrooms and communal spaces; a dusky red hue on the doorways and storage units, furniture, and elements of the facade unifies the entire pavilion “in the emblematic color of the village,” says Emixi. The facade’s soft green color grounds the classroom pavilion within its park setting.

photo_credit Karina Castro
Karina Castro
photo_credit Karina Castro
Karina Castro
photo_credit Emixi Architectes
Emixi Architectes