Villa Kogelhof in Kamperland

Villa Kogelhof in Kamperland

Private Houses
Kamperland, Netherlands - Build completed in 2013
Si-XVilla Kogelhof

story by Si-X

Villa Kogelhof
Villa Kogelhof
Si-X as Manufacturers
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Jeroen Musch

Villa Kogelhof Winner of ARC13 Architecture Award

Paul de Ruiter Architects as Architects

This energy neutral structure is an unorthodox accommodation with an unique architecture.The design is a spartan interior coupled with a view of the stunning surrounding landscape of Zeeland. The underground volume consists of the entrance, parking, storage, bathroom and a workspace which looks out over the pond, while the living area is situated in the floating glass box above ground.


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During a festive award ceremony in Rotterdam (NL), Villa Kogelhof was awarded with the ARC13 Architecture prize. The award is given to projects wherein the usage and the technology are aligned in an innovative manner, aiming to strengthen sustainability as an integral part of architecture. Villa Kogelhof was nominated alongside 3 other projects out of a record number of 110 entries.


The jury report said: ‘Villa Kogelhof is the unorthodox accommodation for an ambitious client with an unique architecture. The uncompromising design is a spartan interior coupled with a view of the stunning surrounding landscape of Zeeland. In addition, the villa makes a statement within a world of sustainability which is usually associated with eco-conscious tree huggers: but why should sustainability be no Prada?’ The jury consisted of Don Murphy (VMX architects, chairman of the jury), Marjolein van Eig (Inbo), Tracy Metz (journalist and author), Bianca Seekles (ERA Contour) and Harm Tilman (de Architect, secretary of the jury).


Ecology The 25 hectare estate is part of a larger program initiated by the government, which aims to connect regional ecological zones throughout the country. The current owner bought the site, once farmland, in 2006. It is a protected habitat for animals and plants and a major tourist draw in the area, open to the public. Permission to build a house on the land was given only on condition that it was returned to its pre-agricultural state. The planting of some 71,000 six-year-old trees hint at the future of the estate as ‘a villa in the woods’ and were planted already in 2006. A rectangular pond was digged, requiring the removal of 70,000 cubic metres of soil.


Contrast The underground volume of the house consists the entrance, parking (for 6 cars and a tractor), storage, bathroom and a workspace which looks out over the pond. The living area is situated in the floating glass box above ground. It’s floor plan is completely open, except for some subtle glass room dividers. There are several seperate volumes for the kitchen, bedrooms, bathroom and a multifunctional room. The patio has glass doors on both sides, so that it’s both accessible through the living room and the bathroom. The entire floor is covered with white epoxy and the furniture consists of desiger classics from Le Corbusier and Eileen Grey. The façade is completely made out of glass and offers a spectacular view over the surrounding landscape.


Self-sufficient One of the main principles of Villa Kogelhof was to translate luxury into the happiness of independence. The goal for the villa was to be self-sufficient; to generate its own energy, to heat its own water and to recycle the garbage. To make sure Villa Kogelhof is energy neutral, the façade offers an important contribution. This so called climate-façade is composed of an outer layer of clear insulated glass from floor to ceiling and an inner layer of sun-reflecting fabric that can be rolled up and unrolled. When the fabric is lowered, an air cavity is formed in which the air from the villa is extracted of a central ventilation system. The house is heated by a central heating system in combination with an air pump. Warm water will in the near future be generated by using a range stove, in which wood will be fired from the trees out of the private forest of the estate. Electricity is generated from the PV-cells on the roof and also from the planned windmill.

A touch of luxury

Gira as Manufacturers

The architect selected the Gira E2 switch series in anthracite to match the entire ensemble, because the series' reduced design and clear form, ideally suit the interior design concept.


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Living where others go on holidays: In the town Kamperland, located in the Dutch province of Zeeland. In this coastal town, residents and holidaymakers enjoy walks on the beach, romping around in the ocean, and warm evenings with friends. A family of builders chose this idyllic location for its new home. The result is a spectacular residence covering 715 square metres, designed by the architecture firm Paul de Ruiter in Amsterdam.


From the very beginning it was apparent that the unusual landscape needed to be conserved as much as possible. In addition, the builders used typical regional characteristics as their orientation when designing the home. You can understand the villa's architecture when you consider the province, which features islands and peninsulas that are divided by canals and held together by dams and bridges. The famous Oosterscheldekering (Eastern Scheldt storm surge barrier) can be seen on the horizon.


The builder wanted a simple yet visually striking and unusual home. Architect Paul de Ruiter created two structures which are arranged at a right angle and connected by an open floor. An underground portion of the villa was built into the landscape: it houses a garage for six cars and a tractor, as well as a spacious office, bathroom, and storage room. Half of the ground floor is built into a slope.


A gentle touch for nature


A staircase leads into the family's actual living space, an elongated glass structure. A kitchen area, bathrooms, and storage rooms feature an insular design. The bedrooms are located at each end of the floor. The architect selected the Gira E2 switch series in anthracite to match the entire ensemble because the series' reduced design and clear form ideally suit the interior design concept. The builders were also set on their vision of open and spacious living. Paul de Ruiter even improved upon this: The family actually lives up in the air. The top floor soars 3.5 metres above the ground and benefits from its large glass façade. The separation of the indoors from the outdoors is fluid, and the contact with nature is perceivable.


Energy-efficient


A clever energy concept and climate façade are components of the home technology. The villa is zero-energy due to a heat pump, photovoltaic system, and wind turbine. 71,000 trees, which will also be used for pellet heating, will also be planted on the property. This ensures that the residence has a comfortable room climate whatever the season – efficiently and ecologically.

Villa Kogelhof

Si-X as Manufacturers

This residence is realized with simple materials:  steel, concrete and glass. Si-X had made the technical solutions and delivered and installed all the glass for the project; Floor-glass panels, entrance facade, roof-glass panel, exterior facade, minimal frame system, Interior glass etc.

Glass-hardware is delivered by Dorma, Hawa, Cilindric and PBA Italy.


More from the manufacturer:


Steel, concrete and glass Modern Architecture on Dutch flat landscape in the province of Zeeland. The full transparent residence is designed by Paul de Ruiter at Amsterdam. This residence is realised with simple materials: steel, concrete and glass.


Glass-details From the first sketch of this fantastic residence we have given our know how to help Paul de Ruiter to realise his design. By order we have done the glass-engineering and making sharp details: less is more. For the success we are also happy with the owner of this residence. He knows what he wants, and give also his energy to bring the details on higher level. As usual the success is coming only by positive teamwork: owner, architect, builder and Si-X. Al partners had given their know how. Specially I will say thanks to the team-leader / woodworker Johny Keurhorst. He know exactly what we would like to have: minimum tolerance and details of the design. He was more like a practical designer!


Job of Si-X We have make technical solutions, deliver and install all the glass for this great project:      - Floor-glass panels, triple layer not-isolated glass, located under the water above the underground        parking. That give the brilliant light into the parking under the water.      - Entrance façade:        Isolation glass, laminated with a white interlayer to give the light effect on night.      - Roof-glass panel: size 4.725 x 2.251mm.10 mm SKN165 (outside) and extra clear laminated 10/10.4. Black spacer with silicone        sealant and argon filled. This glasspanel give the panorama view from the underground parking to the sky!      - Exterior façade: 323 m2 of isolation glass, 10 mm SKN165 (outside) and extra clear laminated 10/10.4. Black spacer with        silicone sealant and argon filled. Each panel has a height of 3.210mm. The joint between each glass-panel is on side filled by        Soudal 304N.      - Minimal frame system: between the living and the patio and also from the bathroom to the Patio we deliver and install the        Minimal frame system like PanoramaH! Switserland.      - Interior glass: all interior glass-doors, glass-walls are realised by 12mm extra clear tempered glass, partly satinato for have        some private feeling. Glass-hardware is delivered by Dorma, Hawa, Cilindric and PBA Italy.


Glass-supplier all glass: Thiele Glass, Germany Minimal Frame System: PanoramaH! or others Glass-door hardware: PBA Italy

NEW ESTATE KOGELHOF

Bosch Slabbers as Landscape Architects

A large arch through the woods eventually leads to the entrance of the villa. The garden around the villa is comprised of a sleek relief with grass and the landscape forms a tight ensemble. The village Kamperland has gained a unique outdoor area, while the villa contributes to the housing economy in the province of Zeeland.


More from the landscape architect:


Since the beginning of this century it has again been possible to create new country estates in the Netherlands. Estates have a long tradition in the Netherlands. Following the Second World War however, the government was very reluctant in allowing new developments in outlying areas. The outlying areas were in fact integrally protected and locked for new planning. Areas with historic estates form a beloved part of the Dutch countryside. Specifically in the vicinity of the city or in busy recreational areas they are frequently and heartily used for walks and bike rides. The Gooi- and Vechtregion and the Kennemerland are striking examples. They are historic landscapes with estates often dating back to the eighteenth century. The accompaniment of culture and nature has significantly aided to the appreciation that exists for estates.


In the Netherlands, which is densely populated, there was and is a growing desire to create new and publically accessible areas of nature, preferably without the need of government funding. Within the government this gave rise to the idea of making it possible to build estates again. The thought is relatively straightforward: a private person is given the unique possibility to build in the outer regions and in return must plant new nature. The new nature areas have to be open to the public. The Estate Kogelhof (25 ha) near Kamperland in Zeeland is an appealing contemporary example of this.


Estates are characterized by eccentric views, commissioned by eccentric clients. This was already the case for historic estates and is also the case for the new estate Kogelhof near Kamperland. The landscape of Noord-Beveland is wide and rational. The design of the estate Kogelhof plays into this. The view of the polder land, with the storm surge barrier in the Oosterschelde at the horizon, forms one of the most important traits of the location. This view is utilized in the design and further dramatized. A sleek island (peninsula) defines the transition between the estate and the polder landscape. Five hundred poplars have been planted on the island, which also forms the entrance to the estate. Once the poplars have fully grown, there will be a cathedral of trees!


The estate side of the island will be fringed by a Z-shaped ‘grand canal’. Included in the forestation, four land plots are situated along this canal. The length of the canal is 380 by 30 meters. The widest part of the canal is 130 by 60 meters. At the top of this section the location of the main estate building is formed. Villa Kogelhof is built here: By situating the main building here the view over the water is used optimally, and by extension the view over the polder landscape, with modern wind turbines and the storm surge barrier in the background.


When entering the estate, Villa Kogelhof is barely visible through the trees of the tree orchard. After crossing the canal a visitor to the villa will enter the woods (the villa is then completely out of sight). A large arch through the woods eventually leads to the entrance of the villa, which only then becomes visible to its full extent. The garden around the villa is comprised of a sleek relief with grass, within which, as its sole complimenting element, a single tree is included. Just as with historic estates the villa and landscape thus form a tight ensemble.


The estate was shaped with a fully closed soil balance. Through the construction of the canal 70.000 m3 of soil NEW ESTATE KOGELHOF | 5 became available. This soil is processed into two bodies of soil. One of these marks the entrance on the island, on the side of the Jacobadijk. The poplar tree pattern is extended over this body of soil. The second and largest body of soil is mostly wooded and is located on the eastern side of the canal. This body of soil comes out by the ‘back entrance’ of the estate on the Ruiterplaatweg. Three rows of poplars have also been planted here. The woods of the estate are comprised of a hardwood mixture of oak, hornbeam and linden amongst others.


The estate was completed in 2012 and has been opened to the public. The village Kamperland has gained a unique outdoor area, while the villa contributes to the housing economy in the province of Zeeland.

Products used in this project
Product Specifications
BrandCategoryProducts
GiraGiraManufacturers
InTecManufacturers
Saint Gobain GlassSaint Gobain GlassManufacturers
Si-XSi-XManufacturers
Thiele GlassThiele GlassManufacturers
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